Basic equipment thread

Tom66207

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I've tried searching several times, but I can't seem to read threads that pop up on searches. I'm just looking to start out engraving, trying my hand to improve the quality of metal work and knifework that I commission.

The pieces I've been able to see, just by surfing on the forum, are far beyond amazing, and something I think will take years of practice. I want to just master the basics, and not break the bank.

Can someone point me to posts I might be able to read, or can an administrator help me figure out what's wrong?
 

JJ Roberts

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#4
If it was not for James Meek's book we would be here today,he open it up for all to get a start at engraving,he's my hero. J.J.
 

monk

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#5
ditto. it's sorta like intro 2 engraving 101 mr meeks showed all the disciplines one needed to master to become an engraver. there was enough there to show you it was possible to engrave if one really wanted to learn.
 

monk

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#6
I've tried searching several times, but I can't seem to read threads that pop up on searches. I'm just looking to start out engraving, trying my hand to improve the quality of metal work and knifework that I commission.

The pieces I've been able to see, just by surfing on the forum, are far beyond amazing, and something I think will take years of practice. I want to just master the basics, and not break the bank.

Can someone point me to posts I might be able to read, or can an administrator help me figure out what's wrong?
try looking at the very beginning of the forum page. much to learn there.
 

Dave London

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#7
OK just the basics hammer and chisel minimum one year, airgravers
one month or more. Plus drawing . This is 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. Just my experience YMMV . After retiring
I spent 6 months 8 hrs a day In the shop ,putting chips on the floor, thought I had a good start LOL
 

monk

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#8
as dave alluded to, if you're in a rush, forget it ! slow down. few are ever even half good at this pursuit without lots of practice !
 

JohnC

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#9
Hammer and chisel can last a long time even longer if practice is two or three hours at a time. I still can't draw very well so my basic practice is cutting line art drawing. I have now entered retirement and seldom can fit in an eight hour day. Two or three hours is hard to keep from being interrupted. Cutting lines 3/4" lines for practice is a good start. Most drawing scrolls etc are made up of a series of short lines.
 
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Tom66207

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Everyone, thanks so much for replying! I'm pretty sure manual gravers will be easy for me to produce; I'm a machinist, so I've got plenty of HSS, and relatively easy access to a wood lathe to make handles. The hammer should be relatively easy to acquire as well, I've got quite a few, but probably not enough small ones. If I don't it should be pretty easy to make one.

I'm guessing for graver profiles it'll be easy to find if I just google different styles of engraving with the tools used?
 
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#12
If you can get a copy
of John Shippers book, you can learn a lot from it. I attended his work shop last fall. His book is like a hard copy of his class. You will be off to a good start.
I am really impressed by the Schippers book. How canI find info on his workshop?
 

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