Beginner - Advice on cutting simple wheat stalks?

WesTexan

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Joined
Feb 28, 2013
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3
Location
Central TX.
Hello, I am currently in the process of learning to build bits/spurs/buckles, and would love some advice on what may be required to do some simple wheat cut engraving. I am going for the “Texas Style” engraving that is common on these types of handmade cowboy tools.

I am currently setting up my borders with a flat graver, using the wriggle technique. It looks pretty good, but I still have a lot of space I need to fill with simple designs. Any recommendations on what equipment I should look at as a beginner for this application? I have never touched a pneumatic engraving machine in my life, but I am very determined to continue down this path and would greatly appreciate any suggestions on machines/tools needed to get started.

Thank you for reading, I look forward to learning from you all here. And I hope everyone has a great weekend!
 
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monk

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welcome. you could begin by checking out the "tips and tools for beginners". there are several lifetimes of information here. there's a truckload of videos, some free, and some for pay. there has never been a better time to learn the engraving disciplines.
 

Jonathan.Silas

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Check GRS. They sell a very good DVD by Diane Scalese. It will be the best source to get you started. She also teaches at GRS so look at the course schedule and click on her name. She has many examples of her work. If you can take a class. I took several from her and you will learn a lot.

I second this whole heartedly, Scalese did a knock out job showing the cuts and the theory behind them. Brightcut looked impossibly complicated but she breaks it down beautifully.
 

WesTexan

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Joined
Feb 28, 2013
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3
Location
Central TX.
Thanks again for the help, everyone. I have been doing some research and looking into a few classes later in the year. When it comes to equipment, I have been eying the GRS graversmith. I want to get a machine that I can grow in to, and it seems like this one would have more than enough capability for anything I would ever need. Any input on this machine or recommendations for others? I am serious about building bits and spurs, and engraving them is a necessity, so I don't think it's something I'll just be trying a few times and moving on. That said, I am willing to pony-up for a good set-up.

Any other input is greatly appreciated.
 

doug

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Apr 11, 2009
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Hillsboro,Ohio
Look up Bruce Cheney he has some good video of Texas style engraving . If you're talking about the wheat stock cuts that I think you are they are fairly easy to hand push in silver until you are ready to go to power.
 

allan621

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You should give a look at the Otto Carter website. ( OttoCarver.com) A truly great engraver and artist who gives private instruction. Lives in Abilene. If nothing else check out the wide variety of pieces he's done. All incredibly well done.

I have a friend who lives in Texas who says nothing in Texas is close to anything else in Texas. Unless you live in Houston or Dallas Fort Worth where he says everything is too close to each other.

Allan
 

wdale.bass

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Joined
Dec 23, 2008
Messages
67
Location
Amarillo,Texas
Thanks again for the help, everyone. I have been doing some research and looking into a few classes later in the year. When it comes to equipment, I have been eying the GRS graversmith. I want to get a machine that I can grow in to, and it seems like this one would have more than enough capability for anything I would ever need. Any input on this machine or recommendations for others? I am serious about building bits and spurs, and engraving them is a necessity, so I don't think it's something I'll just be trying a few times and moving on. That said, I am willing to pony-up for a good set-up.

Any other input is greatly appreciated.
That graver smith will do just about everything you will need to engrave bits & spurs along with conches & all the other area related "stuff" of the cowboy trade> you should be able to fine a maker that can show you the simple to do wheat cut method of engraving.dont ever let anyone discount that technic, there is a maker named Kevin Burns from the Panhandle area that does some of the most beautiful engraving using only the wheat cut.i actually teach Western Bright Cut using the wheat cut engraving method as the base for transferring into the Bright cut methods I have 25 years as a Spur maker & now engrave firearms. anything I may help you with feel free to contact me thru FB Dale Bass
 

pkroyer

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Messages
77
Location
Kansas City
Thanks again for the help, everyone. I have been doing some research and looking into a few classes later in the year. When it comes to equipment, I have been eying the GRS graversmith. I want to get a machine that I can grow in to, and it seems like this one would have more than enough capability for anything I would ever need. Any input on this machine or recommendations for others? I am serious about building bits and spurs, and engraving them is a necessity, so I don't think it's something I'll just be trying a few times and moving on. That said, I am willing to pony-up for a good set-up.

Any other input is greatly appreciated.
You might consider a used older GraverMax. I had one then got a GraverMach AT. Other than the hand control, in my opinion, the older GraverMax was about as good. If you could find the old style GraverMax with a hand piece for a little over $600 it would be worth considering. Anymore than that, I would go with the GraverSmith. Stay with genuine GRS. Your results may vary.
Phil
 

Goldjockey

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May 17, 2018
Messages
237
Wes Griffin has some YouTube videos that demonstrate Texas Western style bright cut engraving in detail. I’ve been working back and forth between Diane Scalese’s excellent DVD tutorial and Wes Griffin’s videos to learn Bright Cut, with pretty good results. Have tried both flats and 120s for Bright Cut, and have found 120s to be the best tool for my purposes. Whatever tool you use, getting an absolute mirror finish on the graver face and heels is critical. For flats a 45 degree face and 15 degree heel works best for me. Same for the wide 120 graver (which I like best). Draw your layout in advance, and try it on a couple (or a dozen, or a hundred) practice plates before you cut on something you intend to put in front of a customer.
 

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