Burin tip cutting area graphical analysis.

Leonardo

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Hi all!

I think that these grids would be useful to see more clear the relationship between the wide and the deep of the cuts. It is obviously that the more depth the more width but it is interesting to see these magnitudes related in a graphic and the area that the burin will be removing in each situation.
I made some graphics of cuts at 0.20mm of depth to show that, as an example, the area involved in a cut with a 120º burin almost double the area of the 90º burin. Also this indicate that you will need more power to do the same cut with a wider burin.
You can read in the X coordinate of the first graphic the wide of the cut at the material surface looking for a desired deep in the Y coordinate.

It is possible to measure the cuts width at the material surface using a reticle. These are glasses disk with microscopic scales printed on one of its surfaces. You can put a reticle over the surface and see it through the microscope reading the measure of the cut. Be careful of putting the printed side down to the surface to minimize the parallax error introduced by the glass thickness. Some microscopes have this accessory include but it is really bothering if you are using the microscope for other purpose than measuring because you are seeing this reticle all the time.

I bought my reticles in Edmund Optics. Here is the link to the page. I would recommend the 35mm Diameter Contact Reticle, Multi Scale that works really great.
http://www.edmundoptics.com/onlinecatalog/displayproduct.cfm?productID=1728

Hope this grids helps a bit!
Best regards, Leonardo.

PS. I enjoy doing these kind of things much more than translations, anyway I will do those that are pending later.
By the way, how do you say correctly: "graphical burin tip cutting area analysis" or "burin tip cutting area graphical analysis"? Thanks!
Cheers!

PSS. I have added a preview of the PDF file in a JPG format but, if you want to print it the PDF file has the best resolution.
 

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Last edited:

Andrew Biggs

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Hi Leonardo

Thanks for that.

I wouldn't have thought a 120 would be twice as wide as a 90..............but you have clearly demonstrated that it is!!

You learn something new everyday :)

Cheers
Andrew
 

dhall

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Hi Leonardo,

What an interesting visualization. You have kept the depth constant and shown the variation in width. It would be instructive to also see it the other way; keep the width constant and show how much deeper or shallower the various angles produce.

Either way you decide to describe the graphic makes sense, but I would favor the second description, "burin tip cutting area grapical analysis".

Thank you and nice work,
Doug
 

John B.

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That is a very well done tutorial Leonardo, thank you for making it so graphic.
It clearly shows the difference in the amount of metal removed by the various shapes of gravers or cutting tools.
Is the 35 degree tool path one you use in your CNC machine?

Best regards, John B.
 

Leonardo

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File reloaded.

Thank you all three!

Yes John, it is, and also the 90º R0.80 tool, but I think that they are similar to a round burin, isn’t it?

I reload the PDF file. I had to edit it because I misspelled "Copyright" and my own name!:mad:
So, If you downloaded it please, do it again. Thanks!

All the best, Leonardo.
 
Last edited:

John B.

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Yes, Leonardo.
It should be the same as the amount removed by a round burin.
And I hope things are going well for you with sales of your machines.

Again, thanks for your interesting technical knowledge and graphics.
John B.
 

Marrinan

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Leonardo, I bet you are one of those guys who uses Algebra to grocery shop of trig and gemotery to lay out the garden arn't ya! Very informative and quit interesting to realize, visually, the difference in the cuts. I would never have put together the few degrees difference would make such a change in volume. Then I had a hard time with the enlarging a picture 100% and it turns out 400% larger! Thanks for the lesson- Fred
 

Arnaud Van Tilburgh

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Thank you Leonardo, I just made some new burins like a 115° for main lines instead of the 120° I used from my start. These 5° don't look that much, but you illustration shows that 5° can make a lot difference.
I now use a 90° for shading instead of the 120°. So I can cut deeper for the shading lines an have more tolerance making the shading lines from mince to wider by going deeper.

arnaud
 

Leonardo

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Hi!
I am glad that these graphics helps to a better understanding of the different cuts types.

John, thank you. Regarding the machine, it is not on sale yet. Although I am taking note of the interested people I am not ready to commercialize the machine yet. May be it would be possible along the second half of the year.

Fred, you are almost close to the true!:D
There is a very import word for me and it is WHY. I think that a depth understanding of the events and things helps in finding better solutions. Thank you for your comment!

Arno, you are welcome! I am glad that this helps you in your fast engraving career. You are doing very well! Thank for your participation.

All the best, Leonardo.
 

Sam

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Very good, Leonard! Thanks for sharing this, and I have added it to the Tips Archive. very informative. / ~Sam
 

Leonardo

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Thank you Sam!

I have added a preview of the PDF file because I have observed that the post has 260 views but the graphics only 90.
Also, the post has been added three times to the Tips Archives. Could you be so kind of fixing it?

Thank you again and best regards,
Leonardo.
 

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