does anybody know

oniemarc

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I think I saw someine make these on either youtube or instagram. When I get home I'll search for it. Not promising anything though, hahaha
 

Matt Evans

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alfredo gm

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On the net there isn't much about this type of buril, it looks like 150 degrees and there are only references that come from alexandre school
 

Sinterklaas

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This was in the comments under the video from John S IV:

"it’s a #5 onglette cmax flipped upside down and then shaped by hand. If you try, using the blue diamond wheel will help you touch up the graver easier than just the grey shaping wheel."


Also I think Keiji Kanagawa was the original inventor of this graver. You can look him up on instagram.
He is a Japanese hand engraver. https://www.instagram.com/keiji_kanagawa33/

 

rweigel

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Am I mistaken, or does Mr. Kanagawa hand push engraving without power assist? Beautiful tool, beautiful work!

Last year, I made a -15° negative relief 120° graver from an old dentist burr (tool steel, not very hard) and tried it out on cold-rolled copper shet, you could turn it literally arround on the heel and cut very small radii.
 

pblack

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monk

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thanks to u all. that is enough visual to show xactly how these were made. i will try and make one or two out of some grs 120 gravers i have
 

monk

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Looks like a 120-130 degree v graver with the relief section grinded back
if i remember it was a 150. the negative areas are extreme. i'm going to make at least one. i'm thinking this geometry may buckle under using it in steel. i'll let everyone know how such turns out. as they say, nothing ventured, nothing gained
 

Sam

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I have made these by sharpening a normal 120 from carbide or HSS and then use a blue or grey wheel to grind away the underside. Alexandre and Johnny Oro both sharpen by hand with a micromotor. My way works fine but maybe theirs is better.

Here's a pic of a cobra graver that Alexandre sent to me.
 

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silverchip

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So what if it breaks?? Start over??? We used to grind the bottom out of some line gravers for getting around figures with out bumping into them but that gets expensive if you break it or screw up the retemper. The Cobra looks interesting to use but not easy to get properly ground,
 

mitch

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I’m having trouble seeing where this graver works so superduperfabulous that it justifies the time and trouble of making one. I don’t even like relieving behind the heel for the graver i use for lettering in silver. And when it breaks, well there’s a half hour grinding everything back and starting completely over.
 

rweigel

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I made a “composite” graver from an HSS shaft and a carbide head, brazing the pieces with silver solder together. The carbide head is inclined 30° downwards and reaches below the downside of the shaft by about 1.2mm. It was sharpened with the GRS Dual Angle Fixture. Angles: V 120°, face 50°, heels 15° / 0.25mm wide, negative relief -10°. I had planned for -15° negative relief, but I have to modify my hone to reach such angles, as the graver does not touch the grinding wheel at -15°. By the look of it, I’d rather call it Flamingo graver… The inclined, protruding carbide head allows for negative relief faces and saves the labour and training intensive sculpting with the flexible shaft tools.

First tests: It cuts mild steel, though when flare cutting, it feels like the HSS shaft is buckling a bit. I’ll make another one with a 3mm HSS shaft to achieve more stiffness, the present model is 2mm thick. Tests on Copper will follow soon. I’ll attach some pictures.


Cheers, Ralf
 

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monk

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tyvm to you all. i made a very crude version from a 120. the important parts were spot on. made no attempt to make it pretty. in testing, i found, at least for me, i could get the same results from a flat graver. although with the flat, the very fine beginning or end was a bit more difficult. this, like the 120 will probably gather rust or dust.
 

monk

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I have made these by sharpening a normal 120 from carbide or HSS and then use a blue or grey wheel to grind away the underside. Alexandre and Johnny Oro both sharpen by hand with a micromotor. My way works fine but maybe theirs is better.

Here's a pic of a cobra graver that Alexandre sent to me.
tyvm sam. i used the grs dual angler and some diamond wheels & burs in a micro motor. i found it to be a bit of a bugger to control. mitch was right. for me at least it was a fun xperiment.
 

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