drawing scroll backbones

tdelewis

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
653
Location
Volant, PA 60 miles north of Pittsburgh
Just a suggestion that may be helpful to beginners. Drawing scrolls, like most artwork is a fine motor skill that requires that the hand and brain work together much like handwriting. Having taught penmanship and some calligraphy to younger students and watch them try very hard in a very unrelaxed way. They take a death grip on the pen and move it in short steps with too much pressure. These are difficult habits to brake. Think back to when you were first taught cursive writing. It was taught using a smooth motion tracing or repeating the same motion over and over, writing a whole line of the same letter. This was to condition the hand and brain to work together.

If you are beginner at drawing scrolls you should approach much the same way. My suggestion is to do a Google image search for a golden mean scroll. Print out a copy of one that covers 2 inches or so and trace it over and over. Get the hand and brain to work together. Don't expect to get perfect results even with much practice. I don't get a good scroll on my first attempts but I can go back and correct what needs corrected.

100 years ago penmanship was taught at the college level. Imagine having some accountant keeping their records in pen and ink as they once did. I cringe at the handwriting of our young people today. A handwritten thank you or note is much more meaningful than a test message. Handwriting is coming to a slow death. Just a thought.
 

Leland Davis

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
475
Location
Wells KS
Ken C Hunt has a drawing series on youtube that will help at least give you an idea where to start. Just search his name everything from basic backbones to more elaborate details presented in a way that is helpful for the artistically challenged like me.
 

Masgrimes

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2019
Messages
21
As a current penmanship and calligraphy instructor, I'd suggest trying to draw curves, whenever possible, with arm movement rather than finger and wrist movement. The larger muscles of the arm, chest, and back can impart your lines with graceful qualities that the fingers and wrist simply cannot.

With practice, you can draw entire diminishing spirals, reversing curves, etc with grace and speed. Look into "Offhand Flourishing" for instructions on how to accomplish these lines with a dip pen. For a more practical approach, practice using your arm at a chalkboard. The large scale makes things a bit easier to internalize.

For example, here's a calligraphic design of mine flourished in just a few minutes that utilizes arm movement.

Just my two cents.

—David

offhand_bird_1.jpg
 

pilkguns

~ Elite 1000 Member ~
Joined
Nov 14, 2006
Messages
1,867
Location
in the land of Scrolls,
Hello David,
I would really like to follow up this conversation in person. So many things that ar best explained by wrist or arms motion. Where are you located?
 

Masgrimes

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2019
Messages
21
Hello David,
I would really like to follow up this conversation in person. So many things that ar best explained by wrist or arms motion. Where are you located?

Hey Scott,

It looks like you're in Tenessee. I'm in Oregon.

—David
 

horologist

Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2015
Messages
43
Location
Melrose, FL
Ken C Hunt has a drawing series on youtube that will help at least give you an idea where to start. Just search his name everything from basic backbones to more elaborate details presented in a way that is helpful for the artistically challenged like me.
Thanks for posting this, I don't know which part I like more, the scroll drawing or his "rabbiting on".
For those who want a link.

Troy
 

Latest posts

Sponsors

Top