Engraved S&W Model 66-2

SpelHD

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2020
Messages
5
I am trying to find out who engraved this revolver of mine. It looks to be hand engraved obviously and I captured what I think may be the Engravers Mark or Signature as it is not the same as the theme to the Engravings.

Can anyone help with this.

Thanks in advance.
Ray

IMG_2064 (640x418).jpg IMG_2075 (640x480).jpg
 

handengraver

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2009
Messages
180
Location
San Antonio, TX. USA
Habitually I engrave "Engraved by..." on the frame where the grip covers it.
Try carefully remove the grips, You might be lucky to see the origin.
I am strongly opposed to the "bench marks". Only real star engravers' marks get known.
The rest remains an enigma to the posterity.
 

SpelHD

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2020
Messages
5
Habitually I engrave "Engraved by..." on the frame where the grip covers it.
Try carefully remove the grips, You might be lucky to see the origin.
I am strongly opposed to the "bench marks". Only real star engravers' marks get known.
The rest remains an enigma to the posterity.

Thank you for the kind reply,
I am thinking that I will never find out who engraved my newly acquired revolver. There is no name under the Grip panels. I have seen that on others though.

Ray
 

Roger Bleile

:::Pledge Member:::
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Oct 4, 2007
Messages
2,920
Location
Northern Kentucky
Ray,

At first the engraver's mark looks quite cryptic but if you use some imagination you can envision that the mark loosely resembles a Conestoga wagon. That is the mark of Vernon G. "Vern" Wagoner, late of Mesa Arizona.

Vern was a WWII veteran who was initially trained as a jeweler and watchmaker. He was a self taught gun engraver who settled in Mesa in 1974 and became a full time gun engraver.

I have not heard anything of Vern for many years but given the age of WWII veterans, he may not be extant.

Vern was featured on pages 163-164 of my 1980 book, American Engravers.
 

pkroyer

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Messages
71
Location
Kansas City
WII veteran who was initially trained as a jeweler an
Ray,

At first the engraver's mark looks quite cryptic but if you use some imagination you can envision that the mark loosely resembles a Conestoga wagon. That is the mark of Vernon G. "Vern" Wagoner, late of Mesa Arizona.

Vern was a WWII veteran who was initially trained as a jeweler and watchmaker. He was a self taught gun engraver who settled in Mesa in 1974 and became a full time gun engraver.

I have not heard anything of Vern for many years but given the age of WWII veterans, he may not be extant.

Vern was featured on pages 163-164 of my 1980 book, American Engravers.

After you mentioned Conestoga wagon, it doesn't take any imagination to see it. Before that I couldn't see anything in the mark.
 

SpelHD

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2020
Messages
5
See, I knew someone would know something. When I first looked at it, I was thinking Covered Wagon? but then So many other things crossed my mind. What you said Roger makes a lot of sense to me.

Thank you so very much for your input. Now I will look in that direction for more research.
 
Last edited:

SpelHD

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2020
Messages
5
Here are a few pictures of her all cleaned up. I really have enjoyed the input

5 (800x515).jpg 6 (800x595).jpg 7 (800x618).jpg 8 (800x585).jpg
 

SpelHD

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2020
Messages
5
Again Thank you so very much. I was able to locate an example of his LOGO or Signature and upon closer looking with Magnification, I can make out the initials after looking at the example It was written that he even sometimes put his initials inside the Wagon, backwards.

Here is a pic of an example that I found.
Vern Wagoner Logo.jpg
 

gcleaker

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
382
Location
jefferson city Missouri
Ray,

At first the engraver's mark looks quite cryptic but if you use some imagination you can envision that the mark loosely resembles a Conestoga wagon. That is the mark of Vernon G. "Vern" Wagoner, late of Mesa Arizona.

Vern was a WWII veteran who was initially trained as a jeweler and watchmaker. He was a self taught gun engraver who settled in Mesa in 1974 and became a full time gun engraver.

I have not heard anything of Vern for many years but given the age of WWII veterans, he may not be extant.

Vern was featured on pages 163-164 of my 1980 book, American Engravers.
Your assume rodger
 

Latest posts

Sponsors

Top