Question: Foredom power graver

RParks

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Has anyone had any experience with the Foredom power graver? Mr. Biggs mentioned the Foredom in a interview but stated there were limitations. I have searched for information and found close to nothing.

Thank you all for a wonderful forum.
Rich Parks
 

Andrew Biggs

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Hi Rich

Yip, the Foredom was a pretty good tool for what it was. I brought mine with the power hone that attaches to the same shaft.........but I'm not sure if they make that anymore. I still use the power hone part.

The tool is limited to the amount of finesse that you can get with it. It's dosn't do small and delicate very well. Big and bold is no problem. It's hard to explain till you've used one :)

Ray Philips from N-Graver makes the MagnaGraver http://www.ngraver.com/engrave.htm which also works with a flexishaft. It is a far superior tool to the Foredom and has enough power/setting to do big and bold........and small and delicate.

Cheers
Andrew
 

RParks

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Thank you for your reply Mr. Biggs. Would you still recomend the Foredom to learn with? The price is what appeals to me the most. I have every intention of getting a graver max later when my wallet recovers from my recent marriage and the drought we have endured here in San Antonio over the last two years (my work depends on rain and what the water restrictions are). I am just impatient and would like to start learning now with as little cost as possible. I still will need to purchase a sharpening fixture and vise. The Foredom comes with a few gravers.

Once again thank you Mr. Biggs and all for a wonderful forum
Rich
 

Andrew Biggs

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Hi Rich

Please, call me Andrew. Whenever anyone calls me Mr. Biggs it normally means I'm in some kind of trouble :)

I hear what you are saying about price etc. Don't worry, it's something we all go through at the beginning. Been there, done that and brought the video.

In all honestey I would have to say no. For the very simple reason that you will outgrow it very quickly.

However the MagnaGraver from N-Graver is something that you will not outgrow quickly and is a tool that is robust and will last you for a very long time. Give Ray Phillips a ring and talk to him and he can fill you in on how much the setup is...........it is the most affordable system around and good value for money. Price wise I think it's on par with the Foredom. You won't regret it.

Cheers
Andrew
 

Roger Bleile

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I used a Magnagraver by NgraveR back in the 70's and still have it. It is a good tool and will do anything a beginner wants of it. Because of the type of action, the engraving will look more like H&C upon very close inspection. My brother also has one and still uses it for parts of some jobs. It lacks the finnesse of the air powered tools but is capable of most things that are asked of it.

CRB
 

griff silver

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In my opinion, and I have used all three If price is a big factor i would recomend the system 3 from grs. I have found the bulky flex shaft a big pain in the rear. just my opinion.
 

RParks

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Thank you all for your replys.
This just seems to get harder. The Ngraver runs between 60 to 1800 spm. Is that why it would look like HC work?
The GRS system 3 has three different springs (extra fine, fine, and heavy) but please excuse my ignorance but do the spm vary or is the system 3 set at a fixed spm.
Thanks again
 

Andrew Biggs

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Hi Rich

Don't get too hung up on the spm thing. It's not a big deal. 1800 spm is more than the human eye can deal with and you will find that the cuts will look great so long as they are accurate.

The trouble is that everything poses another question. Once you get into air tools you then have to start thinking about compressors. You can buy cheap ones..........but if noise will be an issue then you have to buy a silent one and they are not cheap.

Then there is the magnification issue. If you can use an optivisor/loupe arrangement then that is cheap. Get into microscopes and that costs a lot more money as you then start needing more equipment.

So one thing leads to another and before you know it..............you have single handedley saved the American economy by spending all your money :)

Cheers
Andrew
 

Roger Bleile

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So one thing leads to another and before you know it..............you have single handedley saved the American economy by spending all your money :)

Let me be the first to thank Andrew. Between tools and trips to the USA, Andrew has more than done his part to help us out:tiphat:
 

James Roettger

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I would save my money for top quality pneumatic tools and until then practice by hand pushing with simple tools. This way you can work on developing real manual control with the tool that will build your skills permanently as an engraver. I learned by hand pushing and still find at times that hand pushing gives me more feeling of control than any power tool. If I'm running into trouble on a line I often put down the power tool and pull out a hand push tool to save the day. I can still get a smoother line by hand than by power after 5 years of power tools. However I use the power tool about 98% to 99% of the time.
On inside ring engraving on rare occasion I'll retrace my power work by hand pushing if I really want my best work.
Manual engraving skills are a great and lasting asset whereas second rate tools eventually end up in a drawing collecting dust.
 
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eastslope

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Yeah, that hand pushing is a lot of work. You gotta be nuts to fool with that, or built like a bull dogger. Don't you think Leonard? Just joking. Make sure that you keep your hand that holds the vice below the top of the vice so you don't push the graver through your hand when you slip. I've had to learn the hard way on that one, several times. Best luck, Seth
 
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Haraga.com

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Thanks god that there is a time delay on the bleeding. I gives you some time to open the band aid. What about the momentary shock when the graver sticks in the hand?
 

nhcowboy1961

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Hi Rich. my first graver was the Foredom Power Graver, I did a lot with it actually and the price was right ($300.00 or so). I didn't know at the time that you can't control the speed of the graver; for instance it's always at full speed ahead when you press the pedal, like if your Toyota gas pedal revved the engine to full throttle no matter how little you pressed the petal (how's that for a current events simily?) You can adjust the stroke but the actual engraving is all on or off full bore, no variance inbetween. It got to where I would lay off the pedal all the way as I went around a corner, and would "pump" the pedal in little bits to get slower speeds. To me that's a major drawback in the design. It got me started though so I can't complain, and money was a limiting factor there. IMO you'd be better off saving the money you would spend on the Foredom and wait until you can get a real one from GRS, even keep your eyes on the for sale section in here. I still kept my Foredom in case my GRS ever needs repair but to be honest I don't think I could engrave with it anymore.
Paul
 

Mike Cirelli

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Why don't you post in the buy and sell for an Ngraver they aren't bad and they can be adjusted. I'm sure someone has one laying around.
 

monk

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THEmagnagraver, as stated above, is a keeper. even if you advance to the grs series of power assisted tooling. you can have 2 systems at the same time, up and running with 2 totally different gravers/ power settings !! not a shabby thing.
 

papart1

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Mr. Biggs..........I believe then PG is the route I'm going to take for now.I just got to where I can push today, have stumbled onto the acceptable sharpening geometry that allows to start skinning up my right hand!!!! SO I gotta be close. MANUALLY sharpening and getting closer!
 

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