Question: From bright to matte

Matt Evans

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I am curious if anyone prefers to use a graver sharpened to 1200 grit and finer who then changes the reflectivity of the cuts on steel without using abrasives. The feeling of a super sharp graver is just great for ocd but not trying to make bright cuts for the style I want.

Only thing I found to help a little was some renaissance wax but that could all just be my imagination.

Thanks for any input
-Matthew
 

monk

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if i understand yer question-- i used to darken the face of my gravers with magic marker to cut down on the glare from the graver face and top.
 

Matt Evans

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if i understand yer question-- i used to darken the face of my gravers with magic marker to cut down on the glare from the graver face and top.
Not quite but that’s pretty cool too.

More concerned with the bevels on the cut being too bright when doing relief work.
 

Chujybear

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You can engrave fine honed up to 600. You won’t get a matte color tho, it will be essentially streaky. But I guess will hold color better.... but I don’t know how much help the ink needs
 

tdelewis

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If I understand your question, you want to reduce the reflection of the cuts after engraving. This is sometimes called French gray. Some people use toilet bowl cleaner. Some may say to use muriatic acid. Others might say that the surface of the metal should be hardened and then put in a chemical bath. When it comes to treating the surface of metal there are many, many different ideas.
 

Matt Evans

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Jul 8, 2017
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If I understand your question, you want to reduce the reflection of the cuts after engraving. This is sometimes called French gray. Some people use toilet bowl cleaner. Some may say to use muriatic acid. Others might say that the surface of the metal should be hardened and then put in a chemical bath. When it comes to treating the surface of metal there are many, many different ideas.
Sounds like another avenue to obsess over. Will get some steel samples and play around before I put that over engraving. Ty ty
 

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