Laser welder under $4,000?

Joined
Aug 13, 2019
Messages
2
#3
I've had the Dado for a few months now and have logged a couple hours on it. The first thing people worry about when looking at it is its lack of power, but I've found it packs more than enough punch for most engraving applications. The only minor complaint that I have thus far is its lack of near continuous pulse firing. I probably couldn't handle a committed continuous seam anyways.

I work mostly in stainless 316, brass, and sterling. The stainless welds beautifully at the lowest power setting (power 1). You can tack (power 3) brass pieces but the zinc vaporizing at the weld makes you rethink your life choices. Sterling welds well enough (power 4), but I haven't gotten pretty seams yet. The power goes up to 10, I think. Maybe 11.

There are definitely some tricks you can learn for the laser. A little permanent marker on the target surface allows greater energy absorption (I welded pure copper with this trick). You can also play with the laser's focus and do grazing shots. Both are things that I need to experiment a little more.

Ultimately for me, it a allows me to fix my stainless mistakes and not have to pickle my sterling. The Dado gets 2 thumbs up from this guy.
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2019
Messages
2
#6
I haven't used any other laser welders. My only other applicable experience in precision welding is limited to a PUK welder. The PUK with argon is a great option. I think the decision between the two would be determined by your application (limited access vs. easy access ).

I've been meaning to try the laser out with a CO2 flood. I'll let you guys know if it yields any miracles.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
79
Location
Kansas
#7
I've had the Dado for a few months now and have logged a couple hours on it. The first thing people worry about when looking at it is its lack of power, but I've found it packs more than enough punch for most engraving applications. The only minor complaint that I have thus far is its lack of near continuous pulse firing. I probably couldn't handle a committed continuous seam anyways.

I work mostly in stainless 316, brass, and sterling. The stainless welds beautifully at the lowest power setting (power 1). You can tack (power 3) brass pieces but the zinc vaporizing at the weld makes you rethink your life choices. Sterling welds well enough (power 4), but I haven't gotten pretty seams yet. The power goes up to 10, I think. Maybe 11.

There are definitely some tricks you can learn for the laser. A little permanent marker on the target surface allows greater energy absorption (I welded pure copper with this trick). You can also play with the laser's focus and do grazing shots. Both are things that I need to experiment a little more.

Ultimately for me, it a allows me to fix my stainless mistakes and not have to pickle my sterling. The Dado gets 2 thumbs up from this guy.
Thanks for sharing!
 

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