Lettering question re: cutting Old English in the "ideal" order with bright cuts and regular line cuts

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Anyone have a link or reference for a good step-by-step tutorial for cutting old english lettering in the "best" or most "ideal" step-by-step order so as to get the best looking result when not just outlining the letters? (To clarify, I'm not asking about merely outlining the laid-out letters at their perimeters and doing stipple shading or using a liner or wriggle tool etc...; I'm specifically wondering about the best way to cut old english using bright and thin cuts such one would use on script or roman, and if the letters are larger, then double-beveling the shade/stem lines)

After looking through various sources such as Leek's Art of Engraving and the Jewelry Engraver's Manual, and google/internet and on here, all that I seem to find are instructions re: lay-out, and somewhat vague and general guidance re: cutting order.

Wondering if anyone has a more thorough source they might direct me to or perhaps would be willing to share their process from personal experience?

For example, with script and roman lettering, there is a clearer step-by-step methodology that I have learned and the sources that I used to learn it were fairly straightforward and detailed with the order of how to cut these. On the other hand, everything I've reviewed re: old english is vague and confusing -- e.g. do you first cut the heavy shade lines and then the thin lines that run parallel to the right-leaning 45 degree guide line, or do you first cut the thin right-leaning lines that run parallel to the 45 degree guide line, and THEN cut the heavy vertical stems (and thin vertical stems), and then the remaining parts?

Just hoping to internalize the best methodology for tackling old english, as I'm displeased with the results I've gotten practicing on my own even though the outcome is OK. I suspect that if I have a process in mind that I can follow and absorb, it will make it so when I do this type of lettering I won't feel as much of a lack of confidence as soon as I get going... hope my questions makes sense...Thanks for all and any input!
 

allan621

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I will work on it tomorrow and I'll post it in the afternoon unless there is already one available by the time I get here. . Its actually very simple and although it looks complicated to cut, its not.
 

monk

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if your graver control is up to speed, there should be no problem. the oe stuff i've done-- i don't think i ever followed a set routine for this style. careful layout with reasonably good control, combined with practice. who knows what diligent practice will bring ? to me, a highly regimented approach to lettering makes for a look that is less natural, and more mechanical.
 
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Thanks, Monk. That's helpful to hear and that's generally how I currently have approached it but I'm sort of one of those folks that likes having a framework in mind when approaching things and i guess I'm hoping to create/find one I can follow for old english...
 

monk

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not everyone does a given process the same way. the methods chosen for any one engraver should produce the best result with comfort and efficiency. listen to everyone on a subject, and from all the info, develop a plan that works for you. time & practice brings reward.
 
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