Liners of O1

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I was considering making myself some liners of o1 or other tool steel. . I saw the thread for hss and was also considering making some in it when I find out which steel to use. Thanks. Just dont want to do what someone else found didnt work.
 

John B.

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#3
I was considering making myself some liners of o1 or other tool steel. . I saw the thread for hss and was also considering making some in it when I find out which steel to use. Thanks. Just dont want to do what someone else found didnt work.
I have made many liners out of 01 (oil hardening) steel.
Used an old liner to cut them while the blank was in the soft state.
Then hardened and tempered them.
 

Chujybear

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#4
I have made many liners out of 01 (oil hardening) steel.
Used an old liner to cut them while the blank was in the soft state.
Then hardened and tempered them.
Why'd you need the new liner, if you had the old liner? We're you cutting up a heel, or something?
 

John B.

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#5
Why'd you need the new liner, if you had the old liner? We're you cutting up a heel, or something?
When an old liner has been sharpened many times it becomes too short for use and more sharpening. If you can't just buy another liner you need to make one from the stub.
While you still have some good lines left on the stub it is time to use it to create a clone.
Clamp a straight, hard graver blank against the side of your soft state 01 blank to act as a straightedge guide and make several passes with your old liner blank.
When you have a good liner recut go ahead and harden and temper it.
 

sam

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#6
When an old liner has been sharpened many times it becomes too short for use and more sharpening. If you can't just buy another liner you need to make one from the stub.
While you still have some good lines left on the stub it is time to use it to create a clone.
Clamp a straight, hard graver blank against the side of your soft state 01 blank to act as a straightedge guide and make several passes with your old liner blank.
When you have a good liner recut go ahead and harden and temper it.
You are brilliant, John!
 

John B.

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#7
You are brilliant, John!
Thank you Sam, you are too kind.
I come from a time when tools were hard to buy and sometimes it paid, or you had to make them yourself.
Today there are so many reliable tools suppliers that I don't recommend a commercial engraver taking the time to make their own tools when the suppliers have what they need.
But they can be a fun hobby project if time and production is not the consideration.
 

JJ Roberts

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#10
I found Ngraver's liners were the best liners only use liners when restoring the engraving on the factory engraved A-5 Browning. J.J.
 

John B.

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#11
I would say liners are cheap enough! If your time is worth anything it would be a lot easier to just buy a new one
Yes, you are right. Regular liners are reasonably priced and in good supply to many of us.
And it makes no economic sense to make our own regular liners for most of us in the good old USofA.
But I have some imported liners with unique line spacing that are no longer available.
And I remake them when they wear out and become too short for much use.
Also, the Cafe forum reaches members around the word.
In some of these countries tools and supplies are very expensive and not so readily available.
As J J said, most of our liner use is in restoration or in removing and texturing background.
And in some cases the line spacing is not an available size.
 

John B.

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#12
Another tid-bit about liners.
Old time engraving "Law" said that an odd number of lines made the best tools.
3-5 or 7 lines were highly favored. And I must say that superstition or not I like them best.
Our bright cutters are the biggest and most expert users of liners in this day and age.
Would like to hear some input from them. What about it Dave or Diane??
 

DKanger

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#13
I would say liners are cheap enough! If your time is worth anything it would be a lot easier to just buy a new one
How much is your time worth when you're in the middle of a job and need that new liner and have to wait a week for it or the suppliers are out of it?
 

sam

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#15
I had a student at GRS who wanted a 2-line liner and couldn’t find one anywhere. Apparently they stopped making them. So I took a 37 or 38 flat graver and cut the bottom with a v-graver and made him a pretty decent liner out of it.
 

John B.

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#16
I had a student at GRS who wanted a 2-line liner and couldn’t find one anywhere. Apparently they stopped making them. So I took a 37 or 38 flat graver and cut the bottom with a v-graver and made him a pretty decent liner out of it.
Two line Liners have a ton of uses in layout, lettering and detailing.
And if you can't buy them they are easy to make, as Sam said.
Or you can fabricate them by carefully stoning down a wider Liner that has the desired line pitch.
 

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