Lion Punch Forge Adapter - Pepe Tools

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Thread starter #1
Hello Everyone,

I came across an ad for this product on Instagram today and thought I would share. There were many opinions included in the replies, which is to be expected, but thought it would be a nice tool for someone who is a hobbyist or would like a little introduction to powered engraving without paying an arm and a leg to get started. What are your thoughts? It seems like it would be very awkward to hold? Has anyone here tried it?


https://pepetools.com/collections/new-products/products/lpf-adapter
 
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#2
I had a friend give me one and it was awkward and hurt my hands trying to use it. I am not an pro at engraving but was able to scratch out a design. The real problem is I think people expected to be able to engrave right out of the box and nothing about how sharpening is needed to get better results . I thinking one is diligent and works hard and sharpens will have some good results.
 
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Aug 7, 2020
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#3
Hello Everyone,

I came across an ad for this product on Instagram today and thought I would share. There were many opinions included in the replies, which is to be expected, but thought it would be a nice tool for someone who is a hobbyist or would like a little introduction to powered engraving without paying an arm and a leg to get started. What are your thoughts? It seems like it would be very awkward to hold? Has anyone here tried it?


https://pepetools.com/collections/new-products/products/lpf-adapter
Hey Monica!
It’s best to hold it like you wound a pencil that is the most comfortable way to use it for me. The other comments are absolutely correct about properly sharpened gravers and practice are very important for success. One reason we don’t include sharpening instructions is because there is a wealth of information currently available for this subject. Take a look at look at Sandi Sturgon at frontline engraving. He is a professional engraver who currently uses the LPFG for this work.
Chris
 
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Thread starter #4
I had a friend give me one and it was awkward and hurt my hands trying to use it. I am not an pro at engraving but was able to scratch out a design. The real problem is I think people expected to be able to engrave right out of the box and nothing about how sharpening is needed to get better results . I thinking one is diligent and works hard and sharpens will have some good results.
I was trying to find videos showing how this thing looks in action. The videos I did find were not very impressive and did make it seem like a very uncomfortable piece to hold and have to work with. I do agree that a lot of the advertising that goes on online give false hope to many people. They don't explain that a lot more goes into working with the product than just creating masterpieces right out of the box.
 
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John B.

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#5
Monica, I agree with your basic premises. Learn the basics first.
Tool grinding , sharpening and the cuts that the gravers make are some first steps.
And these can be learned by starting with a simple hammer and chisel and push gravers.

Too many beginners see an expert demonstrating a power tool and think that they could do the same if only they buy that tool, only to be disappointed.
They got the cart before the horse.
 

monk

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monica: jmho-- if one is a newbie, i'd think resharpening a round graver blank would present the very first problem. true, most of us can take any blank shape, make it .125 in diameter at the back end, and then have a fling with it. most noobs would not ( in my opinion ) be able to get useful results based on resharpening. most newbies break points faster than i do !
 
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Thread starter #7
Hey Monica!
It’s best to hold it like you wound a pencil that is the most comfortable way to use it for me. The other comments are absolutely correct about properly sharpened gravers and practice are very important for success. One reason we don’t include sharpening instructions is because there is a wealth of information currently available for this subject. Take a look at look at Sandi Sturgon at frontline engraving. He is a professional engraver who currently uses the LPFG for this work.
Chris
Thank you very much. I'm watching a video of his now. I think I've seen him post on a Facebook group in the past.

The hands that I saw holding the tool in the LPFG promo videos looked awkward and uncomfortable to me. But, working with the NGraver MagnaGraver took a long time for me to get used to.

I'm always happy to learn about new tools and think that this one is very interesting. I look forward to seeing more of what people create with it. I am also willing to give it a try at some point since I work with lots of different materials. I saw someone using the tool on shell and someone else on wood. I would be interested in carving into plastics, among other things. Plus, I already have a Foredom and a hammer handpiece.
 
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Thread starter #8
monica: jmho-- if one is a newbie, i'd think resharpening a round graver blank would present the very first problem. true, most of us can take any blank shape, make it .125 in diameter at the back end, and then have a fling with it. most noobs would not ( in my opinion ) be able to get useful results based on resharpening. most newbies break points faster than i do !
I agree. The first thing I was 100% lost on was shaping and sharpening. Luckily, I have a great teacher.

There have been some less than honest advertisements on social media for products, and then there is the all too common buyer's remorse....because there are people that don't read descriptions and/or don't do research on a technique before purchasing a tool, if they are new to it. I think the advertisement for this tool or the description in the shop would be boosted with a tiny educational disclaimer. The newbies would have a better idea of what else they need to look into. Ads always make things look super easy :)
 
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Thread starter #9
Monica, I agree with your basic premises. Learn the basics first.
Tool grinding , sharpening and the cuts that the gravers make are some first steps.
And these can be learned by starting with a simple hammer and chisel and push gravers.

Too many beginners see an expert demonstrating a power tool and think that they could do the same if only they buy that tool, only to be disappointed.
They got the cart before the horse.
Oh yes, we have talked about this in great length before. I'm grateful that you talked me down and encouraged me to first get comfortable with the tools I already had.
 

John B.

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#10
Oh yes, we have talked about this in great length before. I'm grateful that you talked me down and encouraged me to first get comfortable with the tools I already had.
Hello Monica, the tools you have will do a GREAT job for carving wood and plastics etc.
Don't worry, the only thing you need are the correct tool bits and chisels.
Unfortunately, we have not had the opportunity to make them yet because of the virus thing.
Hopefully we will get to it very soon.
 

Goldjockey

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#11
There are cowboy engravers using these types of tools in the Gallup area. Mostly for handcrafted Trophy buckles with simple bright cut, line work, and stone setting.

As a silversmith, you’re most likely well familiar with the uses and limitations of Foredom type flex shaft tools. I couldn’t live without my Foredoms, but for fine art engraving or really high detail jewelry engraving, IMHO using a tool like this would be tremendously challenging if not impossible. Just too much vibration, and not enough fine control to produce really superb professional results.
 
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monk

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#12
monica: you can solder common xacto gouges onto a brass rod to use with yer foredom hammer. the trick is to keep the blade front in water to keep it cool whilst sodering the rod onto it. easy to do with a pair of stout haemostats or other gripping device.
 
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Thread starter #13
monica: you can solder common xacto gouges onto a brass rod to use with yer foredom hammer. the trick is to keep the blade front in water to keep it cool whilst sodering the rod onto it. easy to do with a pair of stout haemostats or other gripping device.
Oh wow, that's a great tip. Thank you.
 
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Thread starter #14
There are cowboy engravers using these types of tools in the Gallup area. Mostly for handcrafted Trophy buckles with simple bright cut, line work, and stone setting.

As a silversmith, you’re most likely well familiar with the uses and limitations of Foredom type flex shaft tools. I couldn’t live without my Foredoms, but for fine art engraving or really high detail jewelry engraving, IMHO using a tool like this would be tremendously challenging if not impossible. Just too much vibration, and not enough fine control to produce really superb professional results.
Thank you. Makes perfect sense. I attached my hammer handpiece to my Foredom motor and I do find it hard to see how I would be able to use it to create really clean and detailed engraving with it.
 
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