More on laser copy transfers to metal

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Aug 7, 2019
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In a GRS class, I found that printing a design out in reverse with their particular Canon laser printer and using acetone to transfer the image to metal worked great for me. When I got home, I found that none of the 3 Brother laser printers had output that would work with acetone. I have seen several recommendations for this or that particular toner cartridge, but most were old enough that those cartridges weren't used in any currently available models. I went to an office supply store and got them to print out the test page from each of their low-end black-only laser printers. I found all of the inexpensive Canon and HP printer toners (available at that store) worked just fine with acetone. So, I suggest that getting and trying test prints from printers easily available to you is a great way to find one that works before spending $$ on one. I found one on sale for $100 that works great. Having a dedicated black-only printer seems to work best, because many color printers will try to make up black with color toners if you don't remember to change the printer to a black-only setting. Black made of color toners doesn't seem to work as well as black toner for some reason.
 

monk

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#2
i'm still using an ancient hp ink jet with #92 black. am also using an equally ancient hp laser unit that prints with magnetic ink. when either no longer is supported, i'm simply going to jump out my basement window ! technology is wonderful, but like time, it's always changing. sadly, no way to change that.
 

sam

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#3
In a GRS class, I found that printing a design out in reverse with their particular Canon laser printer and using acetone to transfer the image to metal worked great for me. When I got home, I found that none of the 3 Brother laser printers had output that would work with acetone. I have seen several recommendations for this or that particular toner cartridge, but most were old enough that those cartridges weren't used in any currently available models. I went to an office supply store and got them to print out the test page from each of their low-end black-only laser printers. I found all of the inexpensive Canon and HP printer toners (available at that store) worked just fine with acetone. So, I suggest that getting and trying test prints from printers easily available to you is a great way to find one that works before spending $$ on one. I found one on sale for $100 that works great. Having a dedicated black-only printer seems to work best, because many color printers will try to make up black with color toners if you don't remember to change the printer to a black-only setting. Black made of color toners doesn't seem to work as well as black toner for some reason.

Arno has reported that Brother laser printer transfers ok using lacquer thinner instead of acetone. That was awhile back so you might give it a try and see if it still works.
 
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#4
For my Brother laser printer output, I use O'Reilly Auto Parts brake/parts cleaner on a several times folded clean paper towel, allowing the brake cleaner to absorb into the towel a bit before I swipe in one direction longitudinally along the part. The other item I use is 8.5" X 11" Avin Cross Section paper, which is slicker on the lined cross section side, onto which I photocopy my pattern, and softer and more absorbent on the plain white back side where I apply the brake/parts cleaner.

Before applying brake/parts cleaner with gently soaked towel, I burnish the entire pattern area of the work piece with a large spoon. This breaks up and pre-releases toner from the surface of the paper without spreading it around on the part.

Once thoroughly (pre) burnished, I apply the brake/parts cleaner on my gently soaked folded paper towel to the part as described above. My goal is to get the white side (facing me) of the paper wet enough to see the design on the other side pretty clearly without completely soaking the paper. The 'print' I get on the metal is usually clear and complete using this method.

So far, this is by far the best method I've found for my particular Brother printer/copier model MFC-L8850CDW. The paper isn't cheap, but I find the slicker side of the paper releases the toner more easily than the cheaper copier paper I was using previously. Another bonus is that the Alvin Cross Section Paper easily conforms to the shape of the part, so high spots left over after taping the pattern down aren't nearly the issue they were with regular copier paper.

YMMV - Michael
 
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pmace

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#6
JJ
I use acetate in a regular toner type printer/copier. Coat the work with something sticky (I use violin bow rosin in alcohol, some prefer Damar in lighter fluid) and let dry. Dip the printed acetate in acetone and let dry. Place image side down on work and burnish. The acetone loosens the toner from the acetate and if you let it and the rosin dry you can position the image without it sticking. Works every time.
Paul Mace
 

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