Old scrolls and a new one...

Bunic

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I photoed all the practice plates I've cut so far and added them to my blog.

I also added one that I redrew from Ron Smith's book, transferred and cut this past Tuesday night (below). I plan on adding leaves and shading it soon.

Click link below. CC always welcome.
 

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Kevin P.

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Mike, it (PP) makes me want to go to Ron's book to check out the original.
I think you should take a second look at your plate>
Kevin P.
I have your drawing on my desktop to study shading.
 

Bunic

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Kevin,

Thanks for looking and commenting. Let me know if you have suggestions. I will also review the original.
 

Arnaud Van Tilburgh

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Mike, it is the big central scroll that has a problem.
I also have done some of Ron's practice plates, problem is when using one design, that you not always understand the flow.
If you then miss one small line, it looks not good.
I experienced using your own design makes more sense, as than you know more what you are doing

arnaud
 
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ED DELORGE

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Hello Mike, if you are asking! You are coming right along. One little thing I would suggest, would be to start the cut at the tip of the leave and let your tappered cut blend into the main stem of the scoll.

Good luck

Ed
 

Ron Smith

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Nothing there that a little cutting practice and finnesse won't cure and it will smooth out. Looking good for the amount of time you have put into learning.

Don't get in a hurry. I always say, if your designing skills are good, bring your cutting skills up to match. If your cutting skills are good, bring your designing skills up to match, but the drawing and knowledge of scrolls is what makes the work look good to a point.

Your cutting is a little rough, but when you background it it will look a little better. The shading is what seperates the men from the boys. You have to be pretty right on with that to get good effect.

Rock on Mike! You are doing good. More chips, more chips.

Ron S
 

Marcus Hunt

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Mike, you're putting yourself under a lot of pressure to become a Master engraver in 2 years. It takes a lot of time and practice even when you're apprenticed and have a Master at your shoulder to guide you. I can see where you're coming from with this piece but to be honest there are a lot of mistakes and carrying on like this willy nilly will put you on a path of ever decreasing circles. You need a focus. You have no one showing you a path to follow so you have to be even more disciplined. Can I suggest a couple of pointers to help you?

First, I suggest you take a step back and forget the foliate type scrolls for the moment. without an understanding of what you are trying to achieve you will struggle to get good, consistent results.

You need to concentrate on developing your graver control skills first and foremost getting all the basic cuts under your belt so you can use them with confidence.

My suggestion is that you concentrate on English scrolls to start with. The large variety is okay to begin with and is in line with the way you're proceeding at the moment. By learning this style it will stand you in good stead for all subsequent styles. It will teach you regularity of your cuts and how scrolls should grow correctly from one another and any mistakes aren't hidden from view so you have to get it right! The spines of the scrolls need to be cut smoothly and continuously. Don't "flange" (roll the graver out to make a bright cut) the spines of the scrolls unless it's deliberately done for a particular style i.e. the 'transition' scroll style. Although English scroll isn't as fancy as other styles it's regularity and simplicity will stand you in good stead for the future as it has to be 'just so' to look right. English fine scroll can hide the odd wonky scroll in amongst the overall design and not look overtly wrong but English large scroll is a different matter and will only serve to highlight flat the spine of the scroll, etc.

I hope these tips help, and good luck. Remember, focus and practice.
 
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Bunic

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Marcus,

Thanks for your suggestions. I set my 2 year goal in early Feb. so as to possibly be ready to apply in 2012. I am a goal setting nut! I get so much more done than if I just say 'I wanna.' Ron P. is aware of what I hope to do and pulls me back to the basics frequently, although he is very encouraging about my efforts.

I have just started cutting foliage, and your suggestion on the English scrolls may be just what I need. Tnx!


Ron,

My plan is to do a lot more chips. Until just recently, I was doing very little cutting and really concentrating on the drawing, which still needs quite a bit of refining. Your encouragement is very much appreciated! Tnx!


Ed,

Excellent observation! I have been starting from the spine and cutting outward. I'll give the other direction a try. Tnx!


Arnaud,

You are right. I got a decent transfer but got a little lost in cutting it! I have started an all original scroll that I will be attempting to cut very soon. I hope you'll see a marked difference. Tnx!
 

Ron Smith

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The direction of the cut is not so important. What is important is the control of the cut from any and all directions.

Ron S
 

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