polishing heels

Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
14
Thread starter #1
Trying my darnedest to get my gravers sharp for western bright cut. Using a powerhone up to 1200gt. I think I am not understanding how polished the heels need to be and I have seen that some suggest "rolling" the heel. Trying a 45d face and 15d heel. Examining them under a loop...they look sharp, but don't seem to glide as I work.....any help from anyone would be appreciated.
Also have purchased disposable disc in 3000/5000/10000 grit.
Also after polishing the heel to a mirror finish, the graver seems dull.

Just a novice here, so be gentle!
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2015
Messages
72
Location
Holland
#10
If your graver is sharp after 1200. But after using the wheels it is dull. Then you are using the wheels wrong. I got the same problem when I started using the diamond polishing wheels from GRS. You need to adjust the way you hold the graver on the wheels. Try to lean a little bit away from the surfaces you want to stay sharp. Also the wheels might not be perfectly flat themselves to begin with. You can flatten them with a coarse diamondwheel.
 
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
14
Thread starter #12
Thank you...adding all these comments together and going to go back to the wheels.
If your graver is sharp after 1200. But after using the wheels it is dull. Then you are using the wheels wrong. I got the same problem when I started using the diamond polishing wheels from GRS. You need to adjust the way you hold the graver on the wheels. Try to lean a little bit away from the surfaces you want to stay sharp. Also the wheels might not be perfectly flat themselves to begin with. You can flatten them with a coarse diamondwheel.
 

lucylu

New Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Messages
1
#15
I’m just wondering if you find there are any times when your tool glides? I find copper and particularly silver rather ‘sticky’ metals to cut into, so I don’t find they are best for ‘gliding’. Just a thought. Another thought is that your tool is very likely to be sharp, so perhaps any variations in cutting feel is more to do with where you hold your arm as you are working? Sorry if that’s not helpful though x
 

Archie Woodworth

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#18
Use a cast iron lap and diamond dust...quick and easy way to polish the heal....and face if you want a mirror finish. If you only polish the heal you still will have a "sawtooth" cutting...tho it probably, it doesn't matter (I'm guessing) all that much as the heal is probably "smoothing out" any irregularities in surface as it moves along.
 

mitch

~ Elite 1000 Member ~
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Messages
2,230
#19
"and face if you want a mirror finish. If you only polish the heel you still will have a "sawtooth" cutting"

AND you have to polish the rear/trailing edge of the heel facet(s) where they meet the bottom/belly of the graver body. rather than polish a tiny flat length of the belly, i recommend slightly rounding off that 'corner' by holding the belly of the graver flat against the polishing surface (i use a fine ruby stone), then lifting the graver as you draw it back on the stone. if you're using a powerhone, do this delicate operation with it turned off. you may want to strop it with some ultra-fine diamond compound on hard maple or MDF.

otherwise, you'll get the same drag marks from the rear of the heel as you would with an unpolished face.
 
Last edited:

papart1

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#20
Mitch..........I think you solved my heal drag problem also especially with narrow inlay channels. Thank you sir.
 

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