Prototype vise top

Brian Hochstrat

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
697
Location
Midvale, Id
Would this vise top be something anybody would be interested in? I modeled this up, the concept being you would replace the upper portion of a standard vise with this plate so you can just bolt down your steel mounting blocks or other holding fixtures, bypassing any need for the jaws, reducing work height off of the table, as well as increasing rigidity. It would be for vises used on a turntable only as it would eliminate the ablity to use the internal rotation of the vise. It fits a GRS standard vise as pictured, but could be used on anything larger than 5.1" in diameter. height is 1.25"

I am not looking to become a tool retailer, I was just going to have a couple made for my own use, but an order of less than 10 is cost prohibitive. So I thought if it is something a few others might like to use maybe I can have some made, cost would be roughly $125 plus some shipping.

Anyway let me know your thoughts.


 

Leonardo

:::Pledge Member:::
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Jan 9, 2008
Messages
618
Location
Cordoba - Argentina
Hi Brian,
What about of making it with "T" slots instead of those pass through slots?
You would save some mechanizing in hollowing out the downside of the plate and also some material too, making it thinner.
The T nuts are standard and come in many measures.
Kind regards!
 
Last edited:

mitch

:::Pledge Member:::
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Messages
2,533
I'm not quite following how one would use this. Presumably you've been using some sort of prototype? Do you have, or envision, some standard blocks made to mount on your base plate? Or would those be strictly fabbed by the user for their particular purpose? Do you remove the base plate from the vise to insert bolts/screws and/or their nuts from underneath? Then bolt it all down to the vise base? I could see where the slots might allow for some lateral adjustment to center objects.

Do you need to drill & tap holes in the vise base to mount it?

It seems like it might be pretty slick for some stuff, but I guess I'm just not seeing exactly how it's deployed. You don't happen to have an animated demo video do you, Brian? ;)
 

Brian Hochstrat

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
697
Location
Midvale, Id
I like the t nut idea. Originally I went with the through slots so I could use whatever bolts I had around, but a few dollars in slot nuts might save quite a few dollars in machining. I'll model up that variation and see what the cost savings is. Thanks for the idea, Leonardo.

Mitch Yes you would need to remove the jaws and top plate off your current vise, drill and tap the holes to attach the mounting plate. As you described, the bar of steel/ wood block, with the object to be engraved hot glued/thermo-locked to it, would then be bolted down to the mounting plate and then the mounting plate bolted down to the half ball. This is not a sales driven design, it is designed for my own work flow, so it may not be a suitable configuration for many. Leonardos suggestion hopefully will reduce the fab cost down so I can simply have it made and forego any bulk ordering and selling. In either case, I'll post a revised version and if anybody does wants one, they can let me know and I can include it in my order when the time comes.
 

Leonardo

:::Pledge Member:::
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Jan 9, 2008
Messages
618
Location
Cordoba - Argentina
You are welcome Brian!

Before working in the new model I would suggest you to take a look at the standard extruded aluminum profiles that are made for machines tables and other applications. They are sold by length in different wide measures and also with various steps between slots.
If you can find a profile that suits your need you are done just cutting it to the length you need. If you would prefer a round shape it might be a bit more difficult but I am sure that it will not be a problem for you.

I am pasting here a picture to show you the profiles I am talking about and a link to the site where you can find them. I used Isel profiles in my machines and they are very good but I am sure you can find more option there in the USA.

T-Slot_Profiles.jpg


Hope this helps a bit more!
 

monk

Moderator
Staff member
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
10,169
Location
washington, pa
brian: i have no need, but a great idea for some. iv'e used many machines using the t slot system. they are far quicker to use than bolts. my cnc engraving machine has the slots. the system saves a lot of time compared to using plain ole bolts. good luck with the project.
 
Top