Shortening gravers

Sour.doug

New Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2021
Messages
3
Hi all,
I took a short weekend engraving class a couple months ago and really enjoyed it. I’ve purchased a blank square graver but found that they come very very long. As my funds are quite limited, before I go and accidentally destroy it, I thought I would ask what the best method to cut it down would be?
Thanks for your help
 

Attachments

  • image.jpg
    image.jpg
    78.2 KB · Views: 40
Last edited:

Brant

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
173
Location
Chicago suburbs
Use it a lat, and resharpen it frequently, it will become short.

Or, adjust to using a longer length tool, it is all part of the learning process, be flexible.
 

tdelewis

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
526
Location
Volant, PA 60 miles north of Pittsburgh
Am I wrong or is that a file you are holding? You can grind gravers from old triangular or round files that could help getting started. I'm sure that is how others got started. You can also use old drill bits and grind them to shape. If it cuts steel you most likely can make a graver from it.
 

DKanger

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2007
Messages
988
Location
West TN
I’ve purchased a blank square graver but found that they come very very long.
I've never seen a graver blank that long. Did you perchance purchase a piece of square stock from one of the metal supply places? Do you know what the metal is; ie, 01, W1, HHS, etc? If it's either of the first two, you'll have to heat treat it first before using it.
 

Sour.doug

New Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2021
Messages
3
Am I wrong or is that a file you are holding? You can grind gravers from old triangular or round files that could help getting started. I'm sure that is how others got started. You can also use old drill bits and grind them to shape. If it cuts steel you most likely can make a graver from

it’s this Vallorbe graver from HS Walsh in London. I was surprised myself when I saw how long it was.
 

Chujybear

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2011
Messages
939
Location
Haida Gwaii
Looks like you could almost break that into three.
Ther areafew u can chop it up.. the best practice is to take a diamond,or other separating disc (as has been suggested) and you score the metal where you want to divide it. Then put it in a vise with the score right at/barely above the jaws and either crank it over with some pliers or give it a little tap with a hammer, and it will break right along your scored line... alternately you could break it in a vise without first scoring it.. if you do it the second way, it will work but you may get something of an erratic fracture.. I’m going to say that it won’t be a problem, you will grind and sharpen away any irregularities..
In any case wear some eye protection.. bits can fly. .

I would suggest breaking off your first piece on the smaller side within the realm of what is comfortable for you. And then see what is left over, whether you will just chip off a bit of waste, or if you can snap it in two to have three gravers.

Also, regarding our vise. If the jaws are very course, it could contribute to a poorer fracture. You want to make sure that the meal of your tool is perfectly cradled by the vise jaws and there are no voids around it. Sand which in with some other plates of steel, if you have to
 

mitch

~ Elite 1000 Member ~
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Messages
2,424
"In any case wear some eye protection.. bits can fly. ."

a few years ago Chris DeCamillis posted a photo of his shop window with a huge spiderweb crack from snapping off a graver. it looked like it had been shot.
 

Latest posts

Sponsors

Top