Silversmiths of Dublin 1980

Joined
May 17, 2018
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44
#2
Really interesting! The plaster mold technique is old, old school. I remember reading about it in Benvenuto Cellini's autobiography, but I'd never actually seen it done.

Watching the designer lay down the drawing with perfect symmetrical lines directly on paper and on the metal is really something to behold!

Thanks for posting!
 

monk

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washington, pa
#3
a beautiful video to watch. i've done a bit of copper spinning, all of which i engraved. nothing as complex as this. thanks for sharing the video.
 

Crazy Horse

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Nov 9, 2006
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Philly
#8
In the early 80's I worked as a machinist at PNSY, Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard. In the building adjacent to the machine shop was the Boat Shop (wooden Boats and Sails) and also the Copper Smith. I loved to watch him work. His methods were very similar to what was shown on the video. He told me at one time during the war (WWII) there were as many as half a dozen Copper Smiths working. Alas, he was the last and he retired before I left PNSY.

I watched him make a copper bottle that would hold the bottle of champagne that would be used to christen a ship. It was perforated with stars.
 

Chujybear

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Haida Gwaii
#9
Does anybody know what the cold water cement is that the polisher puts on as a resist?
Looked up cold water cement... results were a bunch of concrete mixing instructions
 
Joined
May 17, 2018
Messages
44
#10
The 'cold water cement' looks just like the hard dopping wax used for cutting cabochons. Tough stuff. It's applied hot, and becomes very hard when it cools. Might work.... might just make a mess, too.
 
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