Stuff I cut. Steel engraving for a Gravure Company.

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My Former Client merged with another local Gravure Company and than they were picked up by an Consolidated Investment. Than the other Gravure Company was cleared out as they had a Lease, they abandoned a unused 9-15 Cronite but the Machinery mover wanted 15 k for it. It was never a money maker, more to challenge myself and keep the skill alive, I always liked the idea to have a Gravure press on the Floor just to have something to play with. In my work I cut copperplate and such for etching.
 

pmace

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My Former Client merged with another local Gravure Company and than they were picked up by an Consolidated Investment. Than the other Gravure Company was cleared out as they had a Lease, they abandoned a unused 9-15 Cronite but the Machinery mover wanted 15 k for it. It was never a money maker, more to challenge myself and keep the skill alive, I always liked the idea to have a Gravure press on the Floor just to have something to play with. In my work I cut copperplate and such for etching.
That stinks that a good Cronite press is going to scrap. Engraving for printing is gone, even though CNC is hard-pressed to deliver the same quality as hand work.
 
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I'm in LA County, CA , a couple Cronites and carvers for sale, the cheapest is 10k, let;s face it - I print etchings, engraved, etched, aquatints and the only way I can sell them, i have them inside Books I print, by itself, there is no market. The same for engraved stationary etc, To sell it, it has to be repackaged into something else.
 

pmace

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I'm in LA County, CA , a couple Cronites and carvers for sale, the cheapest is 10k, let;s face it - I print etchings, engraved, etched, aquatints and the only way I can sell them, i have them inside Books I print, by itself, there is no market. The same for engraved stationary etc, To sell it, it has to be repackaged into something else.
Too bad. That is a whole skillset gone, like letterpress, linotype and engrossing.
 

monk

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That was my last cut, now they use a CNC mill for it and digital Files
sad, but the "march of time" leaves a lot of good people in the dust. sorta like the advent of the pantograph machine. a lot of great people were left with a bag of curious looking tools. makes me wonder where all the cnc people will be in 50 years.
 

MoldyJim

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I have thousands of dollars worth of tool & die tools just sitting in my tool box.
Some, like Mics, scales and calipers that are in English units, already are mostly obsolete.
Where I work it's mostly metric tools now.
With all the specialized insert tooling, I wouldn't be surprised if basic end mills disappear some day.
Or maybe everything will just be 3D printed, no cutting at all.
 
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I still have a Alexander 3 a, cut mats for Typecasting Friends and myself. Have a small Bridgeport Lathe,
Analog Machines are becoming rare in use, most Machine shops around me are CNC and do 6060 etc Alu, for hard Metal like a S7, they can't handle it.
 

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monk

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I have thousands of dollars worth of tool & die tools just sitting in my tool box.
Some, like Mics, scales and calipers that are in English units, already are mostly obsolete.
Where I work it's mostly metric tools now.
With all the specialized insert tooling, I wouldn't be surprised if basic end mills disappear some day.
Or maybe everything will just be 3D printed, no cutting at all.
last year i saw some rather massive tractor parts that were 3d printed. not sure, but i think they were made of steel. it must have taken forever to lay down all the layers needed to complete such a piece. probably way cheaper than the foundry way.
 
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I had the Privilege to see Jay Leno's Garage in person with a Bunch of my Gearhead Buddies, very impressive indeed, but they use a #d Printer for Metal Printing to replicate Parts and they are solid, that Technology has been around for at least 15 years now, with the cheap 3 d Printers for your desktop everybody an their Dog is now 3d Printing and a lot of what is offered on the Market for Coin is straight Garbage as it doesn't have the required Tensile strength, but Technology takes over, I'm still tooling up my little Workshop and was able to recently score some inspection Tools ans the previous buyer had removed them from his Lot as unwanted 'Antiques"
 

Guido.

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Feb 20, 2021
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Hi Members
I agree with all the previous comments, about the loss of certain trades , modern technology has it's advantages, although to me in the artistic areas ,fine quality work was always the best when done by hand,most of the time intricate designs cannot be replicated by machines ,if you look at fine quality woodcarving for example by Grinling Gibbons, (1648-1721) A Dutchman that went to England ,machines would never be able to replicate his work.
As I have said before ,I collect interesting hand made boxes,this Japanese one again has very fine hand work,small wires and enamel all done by hand.Box only 4inches wide 2inches high.
Sparkling enamel on top called Adventurine or Goldstone.

Regards Guido. IMG_7053.JPG IMG_7054.JPG IMG_7055.JPG clos2.JPG clos3.JPG clos4.JPG clos 1.JPG
 
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Having lived in Japan and traveled, pending in which Prefecture you live and work, some have massive support for extinct Trades, which are often carried within a Family and than for centuries. I learned Washi (Paper making), my Master is a recognized Living National Treasure. Incidentally, in Russia and Romania you can find Craftsman who do extreme fine detailed cloisonne Work.
 
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