Question: Super gluing practice plate to jeweler's steel bench block

Hobie

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Hi folks,

I am a beginner starting out with Sam's Old School Hamer & Chisel video lessons, in which he super glues the practice plate to a steel jeweler's bench block and then locks it in the vise. I am guessing he uses the liquid version rather than the gel version or does it matter? Also, how many drops should I use to hold down a 2"x2" practice plate? I must have used too much for my first plate because the only way I could free it was to take a gas torch to it. Striking the back of the block straddled between two pieces of wood blocks just wasn't doing it.

Thanks for you feedback.

~David
 

monk

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super glue works for many tricky situations. two or three drops should work. when done, forget the torch. instead, soak the plate and block in acetone. it takes time, but works. a far better idea--- use hotmelt glue. available in most anny hardware outlet. when time to remove plate, isopropyl alcohol will allow fairly quick and clean seperation. i quit using wood. instead, i used a variety of .5" thick blocks of pvc. into the blocks, i cut channels with a #59 round graver. such allows good holding power, and virtually instant release with the isopropyl.
 

Hobie

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Thanks Monk. I'll have to order a PVC block and give that a try. In the meantime I may try putting the practice plate and block face down in a small dish with acetone in it.
 

Sam

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I use the gell and apply it around the parameter of the plate and some in the middle.
To remove, place the steel block between to pieces of wood or steel and whack the back side with a mallet. That usually works but not always. If it fails, warming with a propane torch does the trick. Clean off with acetone.
 

Hobie

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Thanks Sam. In the video I thought I spotted some glue at the top edge of the practice plate, but figured it was just some that seeped out from underneath.
 

Goldjockey

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Machinists using a similar technique apply painters tape to the back of the work object, in this case a practice plate, and painters tape to the surface to which the 'practice plate is affixed. Super glue is then applied to the back side of the plate, and over the outward facing mounting surface only. This way once the work is finished, the tape can simply be removed from the back of the practice plate, and the mounting surface without either surface actually having super glue directly applied. When you're finished with the work, peel off the tape, and 'Bob's your Uncle'. No mess, no fuss, no clean up! I've used this method and it really works!
 
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monk

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Hello Monk,

I use hotmelt glue already, I’d like to try the the PVC block. Did you cut the found graver lines criss-cross or just in one direction?

Cheers

Ralf

Hello Monk,

I use hotmelt glue already, I’d like to try the the PVC block. Did you cut the found graver lines criss-cross or just in one direction?

Cheers criss cross is best. about .062" in depth. rounds, squares, hacksaws can do the grids. the 2 shown were done on my radial arm saw. far quicker that way,

 

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hemmingway

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Machinists using a similar technique apply painters tape to the back of the work object, in this case a practice plate, and painters tape to the surface to which the 'practice plate is affixed. Super glue is then applied to the back side of the plate, and over the outward facing mounting surface only. This way once the work is finished, the tape can simply be removed from the back of the practice plate, and the mounting surface without either surface actually having super glue directly applied. When you're finished with the work, peel off the tape, and 'Bob's your Uncle'. No mess, no fuss, no clean up! I've used this method and it really works!
Goldjockey, being that painters tape is paper. Wouldn't a stronger tape like duct tape work better. Or is the glue penetrating the paper?
 

Goldjockey

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Goldjockey, being that painters tape is paper. Wouldn't a stronger tape like duct tape work better. Or is the glue penetrating the paper?
Painters tape or a good masking tape works really well, and doesn't leave residue on work surfaces. Painters tape or masking tape works well for me so no reason to try other tapes. Glue does not penetrate the tape so no worries there.
 

monk

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Machinists using a similar technique apply painters tape to the back of the work object, in this case a practice plate, and painters tape to the surface to which the 'practice plate is affixed. Super glue is then applied to the back side of the plate, and over the outward facing mounting surface only. This way once the work is finished, the tape can simply be removed from the back of the practice plate, and the mounting surface without either surface actually having super glue directly applied. When you're finished with the work, peel off the tape, and 'Bob's your Uncle'. No mess, no fuss, no clean up! I've used this method and it really works!
egads ! another trick for me to try. that sounds a bit better than hotmelt on pvc. i'll find out.
 

flintdoubles

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The painters tape is the only way to go. I use it with hot glue on large gun actions like 97 Winchesters and it holds them secure and only takes a wack from a rawhide mallet to release. I hold parts for polishing that way too but if you use wet sanding take it off as soon as your done. the water will soak into the tape and rust the parts. We won't talk about how I know this.
Leland
 

Brant

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The painters tape is the only way to go. I use it with hot glue on large gun actions like 97 Winchesters and it holds them secure and only takes a wack from a rawhide mallet to release. I hold parts for polishing that way too but if you use wet sanding take it off as soon as your done. the water will soak into the tape and rust the parts. We won't talk about how I know this.
Leland
Leland, I use a cutting oil when I sand, no rust and it greatly extends the useful life of the sanding paper.
 

Neo Dutch

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I use aluminium cutoffs the mount the practice plates. Liberal smear with Superglue and go crazy. When finished, use a sharpened screw driver to take the plate off. Just position the screw driver at the side of the plate and a couple of raps with your hammer will pop the plate off. Have never had a plate hang up or bend.
 

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