The BOSS & Co Bicentenary Gun

Phil Coggan

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The Boss bicentenary gun will be on show at the SCI, it still has to be hardened and laquered.

John Robertson on the bottom, all lines, no dots.

Phil






 

Beathard

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I don't know if I should hold that up as the example I strive for or the discouraging reason to quit. Dang thats good!
 

Idaho Flint

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Beautiful job Phil. That is amazing. I can give you my shipping address if you ever feel you are tired of holding such a work of art and wish to send it out into the world :)...

Mike
 

Marrinan

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Phil, Wonderfully executed work. I am very impressed with this particular design among your many fabulous works. The bottom design gives me the impression or feeling of summitry though it is not a symmetrical design. The right and left sides feel matched and balanced when they are in fact very different. A masterful achievement on this gun. Thanks for letting us take a peak. Fred
 

rod

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Phil,

For the moment, moving past the exquisite execution of the whole design, a level of excellence that we admirers have come to expect on a Phil Coggan engraving, yet something that you must surely continue to strive to maintain and excel, my eye goes to your wonderful 'line' portrait of Mr Robertson at his bench. I just love the way it seems that I have come upon him, by quietly parting the foliage around his shop window, and caught him in concentration at his post vise. Perhaps that is a lathe in the background, and his many wood handled tools on the wall rack behind? Walrus mustache, bald pate reflecting the top light, an easy sense of concentration. I am moved by the scene. If brings back precious moments for me, as a lad, when I would quietly sneak up on my local heroes, the blacksmiths and cabinet makers local to my village on the outskirts of Glasgow. No engravers were within reach. It was at its best for me when they were undisturbed by my presence, and lost in the craft. Silence was golden, and I could learn by watching.

Thank you!

Rod
 
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diandwill

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A stunning engraving, as usual. The one question I would ask is, a what length does a dot become a line?

Thanks for posting your work. It is an inspiration of what can be achieved, and, even though I don't expect to get to your lofty level, it is nice to be able to show my friends the breadth to which engraving can be taken.
 

monk

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dazzling to the eye ! esp the portrait in the oval panel. a total gem for sure.
 

Phil Coggan

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Thanks all for the kind words.


A stunning engraving, as usual. The one question I would ask is, a what length does a dot become a line?

A dot is a dot, a line is an extended dot, the difference between just touching the surface downwards to pushing the tool along the surface.
A portrait with dots is relativelly easy because of the control one has, greys and blacks can be built up slowly. A portrait with lines is much harder, try it and you will see, as the shading has to be precise and it's very easy to make everything blotchy.

Phil
 
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