Help, please: Trying to get back into engraving. Brain-stuck

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Thread starter #1
So basically mr. dubbers was kind enough to sell me an (a personally engraved) Ngraver system awhile ago. I got bit by the engraving bug but ultimately broke down when I was unable to really advance regarding drawing and more importantly transfering. I did some practice plates but none really came out and gave me confidence. Especially on shading which i only managed to get one leaf decent.

The transfer method i used was a laser printer with chemicals (forget which kind). But it was large and basically a mess. I also had issues finding good designs online to use.

Are there better newer transfer methods now?

Basically I just want to get to cutting and becoming confident with my tool. But the transfer problem is becoming big barrier.

I almost wish there was a stencil you could buy you could spraypaint/airbrush that does the full design for you (not like the ones they already sell that have the spirals , i have those) But a full design done with small dots so the stencil stays intact.

EDIT: I was thinking about going to GRS or other schools this spring/summer but covid hit
 

Crossbolt

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#2
As someone cycling in and out of beginner practice as I have time something I have found that works for me is not to jump straight to images but to find a way of practicing the most mundane cuts in interesting ways. For example, I created a maze on a square plate and practiced parallel straight cuts as close together as possible to fill it in using different patterns. This also practices, start, stop, fore and back cuts. (I'll try to attach an image). Just a thought on a different approach that's working for me. 20200506_193504.jpg
Jeremy 20200506_193504.jpg
 
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#3
So basically mr. dubbers was kind enough to sell me an (a personally engraved) Ngraver system awhile ago. I got bit by the engraving bug but ultimately broke down when I was unable to really advance regarding drawing and more importantly transfering. I did some practice plates but none really came out and gave me confidence. Especially on shading which i only managed to get one leaf decent.

The transfer method i used was a laser printer with chemicals (forget which kind). But it was large and basically a mess. I also had issues finding good designs online to use.

Are there better newer transfer methods now?

Basically I just want to get to cutting and becoming confident with my tool. But the transfer problem is becoming big barrier.

I almost wish there was a stencil you could buy you could spraypaint/airbrush that does the full design for you (not like the ones they already sell that have the spirals , i have those) But a full design done with small dots so the stencil stays intact.

EDIT: I was thinking about going to GRS or other schools this spring/summer but covid hit
The GRS plan is a good one. I'd keep that option right on the front burner.

Having the right equipment for acetone transfers is also key. Using the wrong copier/printer for output can make one's life miserable.

There are several threads on the forum which discuss which copiers/printers will work, and won't work.

As long as you have extra "Covid" time on your hands, it's well worth the time to read them.

Best of luck to you! Stick with it!!!
 

Sam

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#5
Please don't become one of the many engravers who is a slave to transfers. Pick up a pencil and draw some simple leaves and cut them. I teach my students using transfers and I'm a guilty party setting them up for becoming dependent on them. But I also preach and encourage drawing. In your situation especially, you shouldn't be starting with complicated designs. Simple leaves and straight lines and curves is where to start and they can be easily drawn with a bit of practice. You can do it.
 
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Thread starter #6
Please don't become one of the many engravers who is a slave to transfers. Pick up a pencil and draw some simple leaves and cut them. I teach my students using transfers and I'm a guilty party setting them up for becoming dependent on them. But I also preach and encourage drawing. In your situation especially, you shouldn't be starting with complicated designs. Simple leaves and straight lines and curves is where to start and they can be easily drawn with a bit of practice. You can do it.
thanks sam. Quick question. Is drawing shading important? this is the part I had issues with and gave up on.

Other than that the stencils helped but i wasnt really doing freehand.

Also is there a way to transfer from paper to metal?
 

monk

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#7
at my last count, there were 342 transfer techniques. a better way-- draw on paper, to size needed, using very soft graphite pencil, then lift with tape, and transfer to object that has wax dabbed on it. compound curves almost force one to direct draw, or waste tons of time. ok, that's # 343
 

monk

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#9
any other advice? I know transfers are bad as sam says but i still might need some to get cutting.
i don't consider them bad one bit. there are jobs that come now & then that using transfers just make sense. years ago, i began doing the usmc globe & anchor. after having drawn the logo maybe as many as 20 - 30 times, there had to be a faster way. i cut an oversize logo for my pantograph. the logo is no longer a pita ! if you ever get an order to put monograms on tableware, you will appreciate transfers. i say all this assuming you have the needed drawing skills. if not, forget transfers and concentrate on drawing.
 

Mike Cirelli

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#10
Try this for transferring. You can use your own drawing. Easily trace, duplicate, mirror drawing segments, adjust your drawing before you cut it, and more. And you don't need a computer or printer just good tracing paper, pencil, tape, and good transfer wax (Sam Alfano's) . Tracing paper works best because it is easier to erase and stays cleaner when you make changes. Also not all tapes are created equal. https://engraverscafe.com/threads/simple-easy-transfers-by-mike-cirelli.4202/
 

monk

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#13
kicking myself because i know i have the wax but i cannot locate it. All my engraving stuff is scattered across the house :
fuss not ! a lousy can of shoe polish ( wax ) will work till you find yer lost stash. if too greasy or soft, melt in a bit of caandle wax, stir thoroughly, let freeze, enjoy.
 

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