Watch Engraving

Joined
Oct 30, 2018
Messages
5
Thread starter #1
Dear Engravers:

Would I be correct when engraving a stainless steel watch the movement is removed from the case?
Also, are the links on the band dis-assembled, or can the band and links be engraved without dis-assembly?

Thank you!
Dave Friedman
 

Ron Spokovich

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2012
Messages
433
#2
I would advise to have someone competent, with the proper specialty tooling, to remove the movement completely from the case. You may need a disc or insert made to keep the empty case from distorting, as an engraver's vise can place a lot of pressure on what it holds. Those links may require special tooling to disassemble and reassemble, with each link being easier to work on individually. In short, your costs are starting to mount up before you even picked up a graver or did your layout, and unless you know what your doing and have the specialty tooling to effect what's necessary, I'd advise against it. You'll have to pay someone twice, and it can add up possibly to more than the customer would like. That decision would be the customer's, and yours, plus the time involved!
 

Dave London

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::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Nov 12, 2006
Messages
1,521
Location
Colorado
#4
MTC
Hot melt glue works fine for holding wrist watch cases and parts,or orange shellac YMMV have fun
Maybe David S will chime in he does a lot of watches
 

davidshe

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2012
Messages
645
Location
Santa Barbara, CA
#5
Dear Engravers:

Would I be correct when engraving a stainless steel watch the movement is removed from the case?
Also, are the links on the band dis-assembled, or can the band and links be engraved without dis-assembly?

Thank you!
Dave Friedman
Always best to completely disassemble the watch prior to engraving. The band is usually left intact although the clasp can be removed for separate engraving. When I first started I engraved a few inexpensive watches I purchased some watch tools from Otto Frei. I also took an online course and found some books to learn how to disassemble watches. Also learned that I did not really want to be a watchmaker. Engraving them is enough for me.

For the expensive client watches I engrave now, the clients have their own watchmaker disassemble the watch and send me the parts to be engraved. Or, I also have an expert local watchmaker who can do this for them if they choose to send the entire watch. Either way I let them know that the factory warranty will likely be voided after engraving the watch so they will probably need an independent watch shop for future servicing. Hope that helps. ~David
 
Joined
Oct 30, 2018
Messages
5
Thread starter #6
Always best to completely disassemble the watch prior to engraving. The band is usually left intact although the clasp can be removed for separate engraving. When I first started I engraved a few inexpensive watches I purchased some watch tools from Otto Frei. I also took an online course and found some books to learn how to disassemble watches. Also learned that I did not really want to be a watchmaker. Engraving them is enough for me.

For the expensive client watches I engrave now, the clients have their own watchmaker disassemble the watch and send me the parts to be engraved. Or, I also have an expert local watchmaker who can do this for them if they choose to send the entire watch. Either way I let them know that the factory warranty will likely be voided after engraving the watch so they will probably need an independent watch shop for future servicing. Hope that helps. ~David
 

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