Work Flow

rmgreen

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Sep 3, 2009
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318
Location
Washington
What is the work sequence from beginning to finished project? Assuming that the project is properly polished and the design phase has been completed. The design transferred to the work piece. The project contains various operations: metal inlay, scroll, relief, shading/detailing, bulino, background darkening, finishing such as bluing, French gray, etc and protective covering. There’s probably no 1 way. Some operations will be controlled by personal preferences and the object being embellished. I have gathered by comments made on this forum that normally:

1st scribe/burnish the design on work piece.
2nd Lightly cut design
3rd cut inlay, channel, under cut, inlay metal, clean/polish inlaid material
4th deepen scroll
5th remove material in relief areas and cut/matt background
6th Bulino work. Has its own work flow
7th Detailing/shading of scroll
8th Bluing - Background and shading darkening if left in the white/coin finished/grayed
9th Protective outer coating (oiled, waxed, clear coat with lacquer to spray epoxy)

Is this a normal work flow from start to finish? Anything forgotten or out of sequence?
 

SamW

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Jan 31, 2007
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Castle Valley, UT in the Red Rock country
I tend to mix and match...doing what seems fun at the time. I usually draw borders then scroll patterns and scenes. Then cut borders including any gold cavities. Then cut the scroll and any animals. I will add gold lines about this time as I like to see what it will look like with the rest of the design, and trim down somewhat but leave the gold proud of the steel, knowing I might dent or scratch the gold as I work and there will be enough to burnish out those problems. Final smoothing the gold and inlaying animals comes about last.
 

rmgreen

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
318
Location
Washington
Sam and John,

Being able to plan/think ahead for eliminating possible problems is the reason for work flow sequences. Thanks for your experiences so that I may learn without having to experience the "hard knocks" learning curve.
 

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