Question: Cleaning/ Finishing up engraved items.

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Thread starter #1
Let me give an example of what I am talking about above. Say for example you are going to engrave a solid silver cuff bracelet. You start with a blank cleaning up all the edges, and cutting and rounding to your desired lengths. You then transfer and engrave whatever pattern you have in mind. What happens next? Does a western bright cut flower for example need to be buffed or deburred in any way? If so by what process?

I apologize if the above comes across as a naive question, but I am trying to learn the correct order of operations. So as not to ingrain bad practices.
 

mitch

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#2
This should answer all your questions.
Explanation.png

(Sorry. On a more serious note, it depends on your technique -is it leaving burrs?- and how highly polished the finished piece needs to be. Also, in your example of a cuff bracelet, at some point in the process it needs formed from a flat piece into its final contours. I do very little silversmithing, but it's my impression that most like to engrave the flat piece, then form & final polish, whenever possible.)
 

tdelewis

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#3
I had a similar question earlier. In western bright cut the objective is complete coverage. All surfaces are bright from the polished graver. In the class I took on bright cutting the finished project was very lightly buffed on a soft wheel. What ever polishing or buffing you do it should not soften any of the edges. There are places where it is difficult to bright cut. an example is next to a twisted rope border. That area can be given a Florentine finish using a liner and cutting over the first set of lines at 90 degrees with a second set of lines. Others areas that are difficult can be stippled.
 
Joined
Feb 17, 2018
Messages
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Location
Central Kentucky
Thread starter #5
This should answer all your questions.
View attachment 43654

(Sorry. On a more serious note, it depends on your technique -is it leaving burrs?- and how highly polished the finished piece needs to be. Also, in your example of a cuff bracelet, at some point in the process it needs formed from a flat piece into its final contours. I do very little silversmithing, but it's my impression that most like to engrave the flat piece, then form & final polish, whenever possible.)
See thats what I have been doing wrong! I haven't waited long enough for that miracle to occur. I really must find a reputable shop elf....
 
Joined
Feb 17, 2018
Messages
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Location
Central Kentucky
Thread starter #6
I had a similar question earlier. In western bright cut the objective is complete coverage. All surfaces are bright from the polished graver. In the class I took on bright cutting the finished project was very lightly buffed on a soft wheel. What ever polishing or buffing you do it should not soften any of the edges. There are places where it is difficult to bright cut. an example is next to a twisted rope border. That area can be given a Florentine finish using a liner and cutting over the first set of lines at 90 degrees with a second set of lines. Others areas that are difficult can be stippled.
See this is where among so many other places that a class is invaluable. Possibly next year when things are more settled I can make that happen.
 
Joined
Feb 17, 2018
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Central Kentucky
Thread starter #7
You need to have a talk with Didyoung. Yes, he is a great western cut engraver.
Skill comes from diligence.
Ive watched what videos he has online several times, could be he will see this thread and respond, I'm hesitant to pm directly because folks have enough work to do with out feeling obligated to have to take time out to answer a question directed at them personally.
 

gcleaker

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#8
Ive watched what videos he has online several times, could be he will see this thread and respond, I'm hesitant to pm directly because folks have enough work to do with out feeling obligated to have to take time out to answer a question directed at them personally.
go on and give him a pm. i know he will take the time.
skill comes from diligence.
 

Eric Olson

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#9
Tumble finishing is steel shot will shine up your piece pretty well without rounding off edges or removing detail like buffing will. Personally I leave most of my pieces with a "brush" finish which I get with a quick once-over with some micron-graded abrasive "non-woven" paper, (Stuller.com # 10-11015, gray 600 grit).
 

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