Question: Cleaning wire after annealing

AllenClapp

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What do you use to clean wire after annealing?
I assume that it is always best to clean it before either drawing to a smaller size or inlaying. Correct?
Do cleaning issues/solutions change between gold, copper, silver, and brass?
If starting with new wire of the correct size, do you bother to clean it before inlaying?
 

John B.

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Allen, I find it safest to clean any wire or sheet that has oxidation before pulling or rolling it to a smaller size.
This avoids damaging the die or mill, and/or forcing the oxidation into the precious metal.
Also it's important to neutralize any gold, silver or copper metal before inlaying if it may have picked up acid from "rusty" hands.
I believe we all know that steel and a dissimilar metal and acid can and will create electrolysis.
As I work mostly on steel framed guns and knives inlaying them presents electrolysis as a potential problem.
Also true for inlaid bits and spurs.
 

Dave London

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I always quench in alcohol never get any scale but be very careful MTC YMMV
i also use John B’s diving board system to heat the metal
 
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Chujybear

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I pretty much never clean my metal as I draw it down. Never had a problem (knock on wood)
But cleaning it is probably still best practices.
 

AllenClapp

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Allen, I find it safest to clean any wire or sheet that has oxidation before pulling or rolling it to a smaller size.
This avoids damaging the die or mill, and/or forcing the oxidation into the precious metal.
Also it's important to neutralize any gold, silver or copper metal before inlaying if it may have picked up acid from "rusty" hands.
I believe we all know that steel and a dissimilar metal and acid can and will create electrolysis.
As I work mostly on steel framed guns and knives inlaying them presents electrolysis as a potential problem.
Also true for inlaid bits and spurs.
What do you use to clean or neutralize it?
 

papart1

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Ah..............John B , what may I ask is this "diving board system" you use please? As per my plumber buddy Dave says. Rob
 

John B.

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Allen,
I use a jewelers pickle solution or abrasive paper to remove oxidation, followed by a dip in a baking soda and water bath. Dry with a hair dryer.
I use just the baking water bath and a hair dryer to eliminate acid from " rusty hands. "
 

John B.

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Ah..............John B , what may I ask is this "diving board system" you use please? As per my plumber buddy Dave says. Rob
Hi Papart,
It's just an extra long practice plate held to mostly stick out from a vise.
The overhang plate is heated with a propane torch.
Under the overhanging "diving board" have a container with your choice of annealing fluid.
The evenly rolled wire or sheet metal is laid on it and further heat is applied mostly to the underside of protruding practice plate. This avoids most oxidation of the precious metal and /or the chance of melting and fusing the thin wire together. Hate it when this happens.!!
When the wire or sheet is hot enough to anneal just push it off the diving board into the waiting annealing bath. Give it a try, works for me.
 

papart1

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Thanks Mr. B..............as long as You have attention, I have to onlay some copper onto steel, and I'm trying to find the onlay posts of Mr Hands and his onlayed gold knives I think.................no results of this site...whats up?
 

John B.

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Hi Dave,
That will work, but I prefer a solid a solid for the diving board.
The solid plate can be pre heated with a torch and will hold the heat before the precious metal is placed on it.
Then most of the heat can be applied to the bottom of the plate without the flame touching the precious metal.
This averts much chance of oxidation and any chance of melting wire or thin elements of a sheet inlay.
Just my thinking, but whatever works for you is the way to go.
Best regards, stay well.
 
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papart1

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cool.....cool I gotta do that with a little piece of copper soon, thanks gents!!!!
 

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