Ivory

Bob Bullard

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2006
Messages
114
Location
El Paso Tex
Thread starter #1
I have some ivory from the making of piano key given to by friend and I was wondering if
someone could maybe point me in the right direction of how to repair the ends where they have
split from age and drying out. I would like to use them for inlays on pistol grips and maybe a knife
Bob
 
Joined
May 12, 2007
Messages
77
Location
vic australia
#2
hi
' bob i know some people put super glue on the ivory then put it in a vacume it draws the glue in dryes and stops cheking but ive never tryed it makers of stabilised wood for knife handles do a simaliar prosses to stop checking or drying in the old days the useto keep the surface of the ivory damp when they were carveing it ivory is very heat sencitive seems to dry and crack while looking at it keep very cool while grinding or shapeing i have half a tusk sitting in a cupberd for years you have to paint the e3nds to stop the cracking it opens up like wood drying out hope this helped a bit
chris
 

jimzim75

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Messages
808
Location
Canada
#3
Form similar jobs I've done in the past. If you have a peace of scrap ivory. File some off some to make a small pile.
Mix it with epoxy. The put it into the vacuum to remove all the air bubbles. Then use a small spatula to put into the cracks.
Once this has dried, then can sand off the extra. It should blend in so you wouldn't know the crack was ever there.

You have to be quick with process before it starts to stiffen up. So make small amounts, enough to do a little more than what your job requires.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Messages
72
#4
A couple of months ago, I made an ivory handle for my PalmControl out of a Hippo tusk. It was challenging. There were some very fine and minute natural cracks that I fixed fairly easily like so: As part of the polishing process, I was using both 600 wet/dry paper and 0000 steel wool. This produced a very fine dust that naturally filled up the cracks. With the dust in the cracks, I touched some Cyanoacrylate (CA) glue to the dust-filled cracks, and the liquid was instantly whisked by capillary action and turned the dust into a solid.

If you want to try this, the secret is in using ultra-thin CA glue. It has the viscosity of water. You can find it at a hobby shop that sells radio-controlled models. Just ask for "thin CA" and they'll know what you want.

After applying the glue, further sanding and buffing evened it out and you can hardly see anything at all; plus, it is very strong to boot. Ivory is pretty interesting stuff to work with, but undoubtedly, being a natural material, there are going to be issues with cracks and warps. The CA glue certainly helps.


 

John B.

:::Pledge Member:::
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
3,174
Location
Los Angeles area, California.
#5
A couple of months ago, I made an ivory handle for my PalmControl out of a Hippo tusk. It was challenging. There were some very fine and minute natural cracks that I fixed fairly easily like so: As part of the polishing process, I was using both 600 wet/dry paper and 0000 steel wool. This produced a very fine dust that naturally filled up the cracks. With the dust in the cracks, I touched some Cyanoacrylate (CA) glue to the dust-filled cracks, and the liquid was instantly whisked by capillary action and turned the dust into a solid.


Swede and others.
To fix cracks in ivory try to avoid using ivory dust derived from a sanding process.
This always contains a small part of the worn off abrasive and will be a little different color.
Especially if you use steel wool, it will contain small metal particles.
Try to get your filler by using some ivory dust from a scrap cut by a very fine file.
This produces some clean fill material.
When sanding a piece that is cracked be sure to remove the dust from the crack with a blast of air before you fill it with the clean dust and Cyanoacrylate.
Just my thoughts.
Best, John B.
 

monk

Moderator
Staff member
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
9,324
Location
washington, pa
#6
ivory , like wood is affected by change in air temp/ humidity. it will absorb stain and dyes even unwanted. i've got stuff in here with ivory scales that came from the dry, hot desert. after being here awhile, i could hear the stuff ping and crack. i personally prefer working with its' synthetic wannabes. i vory will do what it wants. the phony stuff will do what you want.
 

Latest posts

Sponsors

Top