lindsay classic palmcontrol or Grs Gravermach AT and why?

Brian Marshall

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For those who haven't been around long enough, there were at least 5 Lindsay versions before the Artisan, Classic, and Nitro that are currently offered.


I have the first "Chasing" model, the ones where you had to reach up inside with an Allen wrench to change the stroke. There were 3 variations on this that I know of.

Another "Chasing", which was one of the first to get the "collar" on it to change the stroke which came a few years later.

Then there's the Omega, which was a big heavy duty model with collar stroke control. I still use mine daily for bright cut & background removal.

And the "Bronze Omega" which did not have the collar stroke control.


The Chasings were all replaced by the current Artisan or Classic. (which can also be turned into Palm Controls)

The heavier Omegas were replaced by the Nitro.


Brian
 
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Marcus Hunt

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Lindsay, GRS, EnSet???? It really is a matter of personal choice, that's all! As has been said countless times before, They are just tools and will not make you a better engraver on their own. It's down to which system you personally like but none is perfect.

The GRS is good in that you can regulate the speed of the stroke with the extra power coming from either the foot pedal or AirTact. This makes it great for hammering and inlaying as you can use slower speeds which helps prevent the inlay metal work hardening. I prefer hand controlled tools so I was an early adopter of AirTact. But the thing that drove me into the hands of Lindsay finally was all the tubing! It's too heavy and bulky; it ends up kinking and fracturing in my experience. I told GRS on many occasions to sort the tubing and 2 lots of tubes within a fabric sleeve is what they came up with and it's been the same now for years. If medical equipment can have 2 tubes of different diameters joined together why can't AirTact? All that being said, GRS still make excellent tools.

My personal choice is now Airgraver. I find it cuts crisper and it's more 'minimalist'. It is noisier when it comes to stippling backgrounds, etc - no, it's noisier period! Even at rest it gently putters away on the bench unless I turn off the air supply. But it is a great tool! Personally I find it hard to beat, but that's just me. Others may disagree. The PC fails on ease of stippling and hammering I find. For hammering, even with the tungsten piston, I find it a tad too fast but I still use it. For stippling I use a foot controlled "Classic" as I find it much easier to control than using the Palm Control with a finger on top method.

At the moment, I am looking to add an EnSet to my tools as from what I see, for some applications such as hammering and carving having such a slow speed is a real bonus. Would I use it all the time? No doubt it is a perfectly capable tool but for everything else for me, it's Lindsay all the way. But that's just because it suits my work style. For you, GRS might be better so as others have said, if possible, try both (or even all 3) before you buy.
 
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KCSteve

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Chris Does the Enset power cord plug into the unit? If it does you could make (or just document how to make) a cord for using a battery pack. I'm thinking the demand would be small enough it would be best just to document how to do it. In any case, it's pretty cool that the Enset can also go off-grid. Someday I will get to try one out.

Like Marcus, I would love to add an Enset to my collection. Unlike Marcus I kind of like the way the Lindsay 'purrs' while waiting to engrave.

As I've said before, I'm lucky enough to have both GRS & Lindsay systems. On the GRS when I stipple I drop the strokes / minute down quite a bit. On the Lindsay I crank them way up - but that's because on the Lindsay increasing the stroke speed decreases the stroke length which effectively lowers the strength of the stroke. I get nice results with both systems and switch as the mood strikes me.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: It's good to live in the Future!
 

MrBrendan

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On the GRS when I stipple I drop the strokes / minute down quite a bit. On the Lindsay I crank them way up - but that's because on the Lindsay increasing the stroke speed decreases the stroke length which effectively lowers the strength of the stroke.

Does this affect your graving process as well? I don't see how it couldn't, unless we are talking about a different handpiece. Is that not correct? (I'm a newbie.)
 

KCSteve

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It's part of the difference between the two systems, which do use different handpieces. Actually the Lindsay system pretty much is the handpiece.

On both systems the harder you press on the foot pedal (or press, with the palm control versions), the more force on the strokes.

On the Lindsay (except for the Artisian model) there's a collar you turn to adjust the length of the stroke. The shorter the stroke, the faster the stroke and the less force behind it.

On the GRS you adjust the number of strokes / minute. You can use different handpieces to get different power ranges, on the Lindsay you can change out the piston to a lighter (Teflon) or heavier (tungsten) one to change the power range.

There's really not much of anything you can do with one system you can't do with the other - it's mostly a matter of how it feels in your hand.
 

rhenrichs

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I just got a Enset this week....there is no comparison between it and the Lindsay or GRS tools....The Enset is like having a chase hammer in the palm of your hand which holds the chisel...with the foot pedal you can control the amount stokes you want to apply (a single stoke at a time to multipul strokes) there are multipul adjustments to regulate speed and impact....For me the Enset will be used where I would have to get the hammer and chisel out....For the record I've had Lindsay's Artisan and the classic for 10 years

Roger
 

Tira

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I just got back from the FEGA show and I used a 10lb. CO2 tank. I have no idea how much was left when I turned it in, but it ran the equipment quite a bit for 3 days straight with no problems. Much easier than hauling a compressor with me. In my shop I use a compressor. Next time I will try a 5lb. tank for the show.
 

JJ Roberts

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Brian, I find the Lindsay Nitro G20 runs much better with the Palm Control head. J.J.
 

Mike Dubber

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The most difficult thing an experienced engraver can say to a raw beginner who is trying to buy equipment for the first time is to tell him which is best. I have had more than 1,000 students over the years and there simply is not a way to qualify what equipment works best for a particular individual until I see him engrave, understand how he handles the equipment, and make a recommendations based on skill.

Moreover, some of this judgement call has to do with what the student's ultimate engraving goals are. Engraving jewelry and belt buckles, as opposed to engraving knives, motorcycle parts and firearms, are entirely different subjects. Some equipment works best depending on what the engraving subject might be. That's why I equipped my Learning Studio with all the currently available engraving equipment. That way the student could use it all, and we could decide together what might work best for his particular skills and goals.

Personally, I use it all, and I have a preferred bench, properly equipped for a delicate jewelry engraving job the first thing in the morning. That same afternoon I might be at a different bench, with different a different tool in my hands for the 6 pound, 30" rifle barrel I have jigged and ready for engraving.

There is no perfect tool, it depends on what you want to engrave, and what fits your needs, and how skilled you are, and how much money you have to spend. It all works, you just just need know what you are buying before you buy....beyond knowing that, it's all about opinions and salesmanship.

Yes, we all have our favorite tools

The worst thing to do is to allow yourself to be sold on forum opinions without ever trying a tool.

The best thing you can do is take a class.
 

Brian Marshall

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<"The best thing you can do is take a class.">

Better yet, take at least one class/workshop at a place where ALL options are available to try or test drive...

(otherwise you'll have to take 2 or 3 classes at different places to find out for yourself what's best for YOU and what you are trying to do)


Brian
 
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Tat2grave

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<"The best thing you can do is take a class.">

Better yet, take at least one class/workshop at a place where ALL options are available to try or test drive...

(otherwise you'll have to take 2 or 3 classes at different places to find out for yourself what's best for YOU and what you are trying to do)


Brian

Hi good evening, I'm new to the forum and have been researching engraving for awhile. I'm interested in the 5 day class you offer in Stockton. ( If you still do that) I'd like to check out the 3 major options for hand engraving tools in person also. Do you have any classes scheduled in the near future? Thank you for your time, Bruce

( I tried to send you a PM but your box was full )
 

JJ Roberts

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I have and teach with Lindsay engraving tools,but if you have GRS,Ngraver engraving tools jut bring them and I be glad to show you how to use them.When it come to Lindsay I'm the go to guy on the east coast.:thumbsup: J.J.
 
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