Ruger

flintdoubles

:::Pledge Member:::
::::Pledge Member::::
Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
272
Location
Wells KS
#21
The loading gate does not need to be hardened but the cam at the bottom that is against the spring does. I clamp that part in a heavy vise and heat the top of the gate to just starting to get red then just let it cool in the vise. The vise acts as a heat sink and keeps the cam cool enough it does not anneal. It is easier for manufacturers to harden the whole gate. I don't re harden
 

Crazy Horse

Elite Cafe Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
554
Location
Philly
#22
The loading gate does not need to be hardened but the cam at the bottom that is against the spring does. I clamp that part in a heavy vise and heat the top of the gate to just starting to get red then just let it cool in the vise. The vise acts as a heat sink and keeps the cam cool enough it does not anneal. It is easier for manufacturers to harden the whole gate. I don't re harden
Now that sounds logical.
 

Big-Un

~ Elite 1000 Member ~
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Messages
1,231
Location
Eden, NC
#24
Strelok,
The stainless steel wrap method you mention will work but it will not preserve the original finish. The idea behind the small piece of paper included in the wrap, usually a piece of cigarette paper, is that as it burns it consumes most of the oxygen in the wrap and limits the amount of oxidation of the enclosed part.
The part and package still need to reach critical temperature (red hot) and cool slowly to anneal the part.
A good way to obtain a slow cool is to bury the red hot package in crushed charcoal, clean dry sand or powdered carbon.
I also read somewhere, probably here, to place the red hot part into a chunk of beeswax and let it cool naturally. I think a toilet bowl ring was used.
 

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