Snake Progress Drawing

Andrew Biggs

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I would seriously think about "under / over" like Celtic knots. Otherwise you have a predominant line from the head of the snake to the top curve. This will draw the viewers eye straight to it and dominate the design.

It doesn't have to be natural as in nature.........that's why they call it design :)

Cheers
Andrew
 

mdengraver

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Andrew could you explain that in another way for me to better understand. I value your input! I do think I understand but further elaboration might help.
 

Chujybear

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He is saying to further entwine your snake. So that it is literally woven into itself through a pattern of under over.. so every other time it crosses itself, it will cross under itself.

This will homogenize the design and create a balance and rhythms across the whole design...

That is what andrew is saying, and i agree with him... you could, however, just move towards that idea and achieve a more naturalistic design but still remove the distraction that comes from that long unbroken plane
 

mdengraver

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Chujybear I plan on following Andrew's suggestion began a redraw last nite. Will post progress later. Thanks! Like this celtic example I found online.
 

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Andrew Biggs

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Yes, that is exactly it. Under, over, under, over, under, over, etc, etc. Like basket weaving :)

When you design something like this, leave all the detail (snake skin texture, scales, etc) to the very last because it's just a distraction that hides the true form.

You also have to decide if there is going to be a textured black background or plain metal. That will alter the design yet again.............black backgrounds are merciless because any mistakes stick out like dogs balls. Plain metal backgrounds are more forgiving. :)
 

Andrew Biggs

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Another thing I would suggest is borders……………every surface an engraver works on has borders. It is our job to fit the design into that border so that it is harmony with the object we are engraving.

The very first thing you do when you design something is draw the borders……….then the design is worked into that space. They can be squares, circles, rectangles, triangles, splats, knife bolsters, gun shapes or anything you have in mind from the weird to the wonderful.

Random drawing without borders is fine if you wish to go that way………….but it doesn’t teach you the discipline you need to draw within confined shapes. These are the skills of an engraver so you may as well get used to it from the get go :)
 

mdengraver

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Andrew that is all excellent advice. Sometimes I'm just designing with jewelry in mind so borders aren't always necessary but the borders are definitely applicable for much engraving, drawing painting ect. I'm sure your input about my snake is a valuable design lesson for many of us less experienced engravers and designers on the forum. It is a good example of how we can all benefit from the input of more experienced artists such as yourself. Your background? In sign painting must be a tremendous advantage as applied to engraving! Thanks I will have to continue to push the detail envelope to advance my skills to that higher level we all aspire to. Also the borders are worth keeping in mind as a way of integrating our designs as you so well stated in the confines of the canvas allotted for our particular creative projects.
 

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