used microscope?

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Jun 18, 2018
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Phoenix AZ
Thread starter #1
Does anyone recognize this? I have a chance to puck up very very reasonably but do not know if this will work and the guy does not have model or manufacturer (and its a bit of a drive). Its variable up to X40 magnification. Has camera and a light around lens. Im not really interested in the camera. Thoughts?

1531176313411.png 1531176573185.png 1531176597560.png
 

sam

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#2
It appears to be a Meiji EMZ 5TR or Chinese knockoff of one. The chrome lever closes off one eyepiece to allow the camera port to open. If you’re not using a camera it shouldn’t affect you. I personally wouldn’t pay much for it. A binocular Meiji EMZ-5 is a better choice IMO.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Phoenix AZ
Thread starter #3
It appears to be a Meiji EMZ 5TR or Chinese knockoff of one. The chrome lever closes off one eyepiece to allow the camera port to open. If you’re not using a camera it shouldn’t affect you. I personally wouldn’t pay much for it. A binocular Meiji EMZ-5 is a better choice IMO.
I am on the bottom basement budget and could pick this up for 300 bucks. Is that to much?
 

monk

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#4
just m2cw: take yer time. engraving is a lifetime adventure. start scouting the bay for used bino stereo zoomers. in maybe a month, maybe less, you'll likely find a "keeper". i started with a less expensive chinese scope. it was fair. i later scored a really nice leica for an excellent price.
 

sam

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#5
I am on the bottom basement budget and could pick this up for 300 bucks. Is that to much?
If it’s a Meiji it’s probably a fair price if it’s in perfect working order. If it’s a Chinese knockoff I personally wouldn’t touch it without testing it first. And even then I probably wouldn’t touch it. Read the post about buying microscopes in the tips archive.
 

sam

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#6
Also, does it have an objective lens? I can't tell from the photos. If not, you'll need a 0.5x objective lens for it, so figure that into the cost to get it up and running for engraving. And be sure the eyepieces are 10x.

Here's something I wrote on microscopes awhile back:

CHINESE MADE ENGRAVING TOOLS

MICROSCOPES

Pros:
Cheap

Cons:
  • Can have poorly aligned optics.
  • Might not stay in focus when zoomed.
  • Can have lenses made of plastic or window glass as opposed to optical glass.
  • Many are dim, dark, and have a yellowish view.
  • Most, if not all, are nowhere close to being as sharp and bright as Meiji, Leica, Olympus, or Zeiss microscopes.
  • China has notoriously bad quality control so one acceptable scope doesn’t guarantee the next one off the assembly line will be as good.
  • Many sellers cannot support the product with repair, adjustment, parts, etc, so you’re on your own, and imagine having to ship one back to China for repair or refund.
  • Most have very little resale value when you’re ready to upgrade later.
  • You are guaranteed to get exactly what you pay for.

COMMENTS:

I have tested a lot of Chinese scopes and found one or two that were acceptable entry level microscopes. Once again, just because one is acceptable doesn’t guarantee the next one will be. Chinese manufacturers are famous for making substitutes when they run out of materials.

If you have little or no experience with microscopes, any scope will look great to you when you use it, and your eyes can quickly overcome optical defects. The truth can come after many hours of use when you might develop eye strain and headaches and have no idea why.

I would advise finding a good used Meiji EMZ-5 microscope if the budget doesn’t allow for a new Leica or new Meiji. You will have a quality instrument that will last a lifetime, and parts and service are always available.

If you are absolutely determined to buy a Chinese microscope, then buy the seller as well as the microscope. Be sure it’s someone who can service or replace the scope without having to mail it back to China. Many dealers don’t care about anything other than making the sale.

There will always be someone who says “I have one of those and it works fine for me.” If quality control was as good as Meiji or Leica then that might actually mean something.
 
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
13
Location
Phoenix AZ
Thread starter #7
Also, does it have an objective lens? I can't tell from the photos. If not, you'll need a 0.5x objective lens for it, so figure that into the cost to get it up and running for engraving. And be sure the eyepieces are 10x.

Here's something I wrote on microscopes awhile back:

CHINESE MADE ENGRAVING TOOLS

MICROSCOPES

Pros:
Cheap

Cons:
  • Can have poorly aligned optics.
  • Might not stay in focus when zoomed.
  • Can have lenses made of plastic or window glass as opposed to optical glass.
  • Many are dim, dark, and have a yellowish view.
  • Most, if not all, are nowhere close to being as sharp and bright as Meiji, Leica, Olympus, or Zeiss microscopes.
  • China has notoriously bad quality control so one acceptable scope doesn’t guarantee the next one off the assembly line will be as good.
  • Many sellers cannot support the product with repair, adjustment, parts, etc, so you’re on your own, and imagine having to ship one back to China for repair or refund.
  • Most have very little resale value when you’re ready to upgrade later.
  • You are guaranteed to get exactly what you pay for.

COMMENTS:

I have tested a lot of Chinese scopes and found one or two that were acceptable entry level microscopes. Once again, just because one is acceptable doesn’t guarantee the next one will be. Chinese manufacturers are famous for making substitutes when they run out of materials.

If you have little or no experience with microscopes, any scope will look great to you when you use it, and your eyes can quickly overcome optical defects. The truth can come after many hours of use when you might develop eye strain and headaches and have no idea why.

I would advise finding a good used Meiji EMZ-5 microscope if the budget doesn’t allow for a new Leica or new Meiji. You will have a quality instrument that will last a lifetime, and parts and service are always available.

If you are absolutely determined to buy a Chinese microscope, then buy the seller as well as the microscope. Be sure it’s someone who can service or replace the scope without having to mail it back to China. Many dealers don’t care about anything other than making the sale.

There will always be someone who says “I have one of those and it works fine for me.” If quality control was as good as Meiji or Leica then that might actually mean something.
Awesome! Thank you Sam.
 

monk

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Feb 11, 2007
Messages
8,992
Location
washington, pa
#8
the .5 objective lens is important. it cuts the optical power in half, but ( importantly) doubles the working distance for your hands to get in and do the work. even at half power, the useable power is sufficient for almost any engraving situation you'll likely encounter. if needed, one can buy eyepieces of higher power.
 
Joined
Jun 20, 2018
Messages
3
#9
300 bucks. Is that to much?
Hi to all,

First post here, glad to join the cafe, to my opinion 300$ is overpriced, it is certainly a Chinese scope with very bad optics, but the boom stand looks great.

Choosing a good stereoscope is difficult as give advices on forums increase prices on the bay. Few years ago it was possible to find real bargains, now it's quite difficult.

But if you want to buy something who will satisfy you for many years and never give you headaches, choose a CMO instead of a greenough.

Read this topic and don't underestimate what is write in it :

https://engraverscafe.com/threads/stereo-microscopes-to-buy-and-to-avoid.3451/


Every scope recommended are great and some are excellent, those who are to avoid ARE to avoid.


Try to focus on Nikon, Zeiss, Olympus, Bausch and lomb or Wild if you can afford it, you'll never regret it.

I would say that if you can't afford one of those brands, buy an optivisor for the moment and save enough money to buy a good scope and a good stand.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 20, 2018
Messages
3
#11
One thing I'd like to add, when you choose a used scope be aware that parts are sometimes really hard to find.

The explication is simply that most of labs or universities used the same brands all over the world. One of the most famous is Wild, you can find lots of parts but they can be very expensive, depends on the type and model.

I know that in the US Bausch and Lomb is really well known and was used in universities and in gemology, so it's may be one of the best brand to focus on when you live in the US. They can be easy to find at really good price with lots of parts or accessories.

But be careful if you find a nice scope at a good price, look if you can find eyepieces or additional lens, or if you can adapt a boomstand on the headset, and the best old stereoscopes have a special headset who will not fit most of the boomstand that you can find on the market, but you can machine a part to adapt it.

It cans be surprising but a good research grade stereoscope from the 80's, 90's can surpass or equal easily plenty of the stereo microscopes sell today , it just needs to have clean optics with a good alignment.

hope it helps.
 
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